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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Seyton
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0336  Wednesday, 16 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Meg Powers Livingston <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 00:24:51 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Knock Knock

[2]     From:   Nora Kreimer <
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        Date:   Wed, 16 Feb 2000 09:40:14 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0316 Re: Knock Knock


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Meg Powers Livingston <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 00:24:51 -0800
Subject:        Re: Knock Knock

>And does the name of Macbeth's servant, Seyton, allude
>to Satan himself? Is the idea that Macbeth has stooped so low that the
>devil serves him?

I've had students ask this question several times, especially as part of
an assignment where they must compare two productions of the same play.
The students who work on Macbeth often call attention to the fact that
most productions available on video either omit the servant's name or
pronounce it See-ton rather than Say-ton.  The only production I can
think of, off hand, that pronounces the name Say-ton is Welles', where
the allusion to Satan fits in well with the Catholic imagery that
gradually accrues to Malcolm throughout the film.

Can anyone comment on how the name might most commonly have been
pronounced in the period?

Thanks,
Meg

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <
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Date:           Wed, 16 Feb 2000 09:40:14 -0300
Subject: 11.0316 Re: Knock Knock
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0316 Re: Knock Knock

This is not the first time that I read someone play around with the name
of Seyton. My personal feeling regarding this issue is that there was
evil in Macbeth long before he was a king and long before Seyton was his
attendant.  May I, with due respect, wherein lies the basis for this
argumentation?

Regards
Nyke
 

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