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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: February ::
Re: Rice Pudding
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0339  Thursday, 17 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 13:08:37 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0326 Re: Rice Pudding

[2]     From:   Alexander Houck <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 14:20:35 -0800
        Subj:   SHK 11.0326 Re: Rice Pudding

[3]     From:   Kevin De Ornellas <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 23:40:57 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0326 Re: Rice Pudding


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 13:08:37 EST
Subject: 11.0326 Re: Rice Pudding
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0326 Re: Rice Pudding

Seduction by Food

Nora Kreimer is quite right about the fascination of eatables and
drinkables. In my view, the most arresting attempt by a man to entice a
woman into his bed is the attempt by Volpone to get closer to Celia. The
scene is also another example of the discussion of food being
accompanied by song, as in the delicate carpe diem lyric Come My Celia,
let us prove...

I know of one Celia who was so affected by the menu offered that she
fled the rehearsal room only to return for more two days later; she had
gone to the house of a relative for fish and chips, she said.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alexander Houck <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 14:20:35 -0800
Subject: Re: Rice Pudding
Comment:        SHK 11.0326 Re: Rice Pudding

In response to Jennifer Fritz's querry, I understand that the Clowne
questions the use of rice in the sheep shearing festival because Perdita
is not a very good hostess.  The Shepherd accuses Perdita of being lazy
in preparing for the party (IV.iv.72-89).  Therefore, I don't believe
that the Clowne is considering the possibility of marriage.  I believe
the question of the rice is one of incredulity.  I am open for
correction on this assertion, but I don't believe that rice is a native
crop of England.  Might it have been newly introduced to the English
appetite?  Therefore, rice would have to be introduced to English Isles
before it would become a common practice to fling rice at a wedding
ceremony. Additionaly, I am apt to understand that the Sheep Shearing
Festival would be an annual occurrence.  This may be the first time that
Perdita had to prepare the meal for the festival since the wife of the
Shepherd died.  So, maybe the Clowne is noticing that Perdita has
compiled an impressive list of ingredients, but also doubts that she
will be able to make anything impressive out of rice. To put it simply,
I believe rice is too "exotic" a food at the time, and would therefore
have a different connotation.  Then again, I may be wrong about the
origin of rice, and its origin of use in English cooking.

Alex Houck

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin De Ornellas <
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Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 23:40:57 GMT
Subject: 11.0326 Re: Rice Pudding
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0326 Re: Rice Pudding

>I have always loved reading about food, as English literature, more than
>any other is rich in references to eating, table manners, etc, since the
>time of Chaucer...Drinking in the AS halls was referred to as early as
>Beowulf. These titles might be of help:
>
>Toussaint-Samat, Maguelonne, 1987, translated by Anthea Bell, 1992.
>_History of Food_ USA: Blackwell.
>
>Tannahill, Reay, 1973. _Food in History_. New, Fully Revised and Updated
>Edition, 1988. England: Penguin.

A couple of more recent studies of food in English culture:

Hugh Magennis, 'Anglo-Saxon Appetites: Food and Drink and Their
Consumption in Old English and Related Literature' (Dublin: Four
Courts Press, 1999).

Richard Gough, ed., 'Performance Research' 4.1 (1999), issue centred
'On Cooking'.

Kevin De Ornellas B.A., M.A.
School of English
Queen's University
 

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