2000

Re: The Unelected

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0318  Tuesday, 15 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Feb 2000 10:43:22 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0308 Re: Intellectual Property

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 05:41:34 -0500
        Subj:   Intellectual Property

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 10:43:22 -0800
Subject: 11.0308 Re: Intellectual Property
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0308 Re: Intellectual Property

John Briggs writes:

>The point I was trying to make was
>that the (unwritten) British constitution evolved to a
>nineteenth-century form, but was unable to develop further because of
>the presence of the monarchy and the (unelected) House of Lords, despite
>the fact that neither had real power.

As a side-note, I understand that the first Labour budget was brought in
by playing the monarchy off against the Lords.  In this case, the
monarchy seemed to be the sponsor, rather than the inhibitor, of
democratic reform.

By the way, most commonwealth countries have had or continue to have an
elected monarchy and an unelected upper chamber.  In most, though, it
doesn't particularly stop constitutional reform, which in the Canadian
case, has been held up for other reasons.

Cheers,
Se


Re: Money (KJV)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0317  Tuesday, 15 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Feb 2000 09:53:18 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0306 Re: Money

[2]     From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 09:02:18 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0306 Re: Money


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 09:53:18 -0800
Subject: 11.0306 Re: Money
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0306 Re: Money

Alexander Houck writes:

>I am glad this
>reminded Steven Marx of the going rate of the King James Bible, because
>Shakespeare was supposedly editing, or rather, helping to edit the King
>James Bible when The Winter's Tale was produced.  When I made this
>reference of the KJ Bible, my director had not heard of it, but other
>actors had.  I can't remember the exact story of how there is "proof"
>that Shakespeare contributed to the King James Bible.

We've been through it already, and I seem to remember it being hogwash.
You can always check the archives.

Cheers,
Se


Re: Saints & Sinners

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0315  Tuesday, 15 February 2000.

[1]     From:   David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Feb 2000 12:50:54 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

[2]     From:   Kris McDermott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Feb 2000 13:44:06 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

[3]     From:   Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Feb 2000 14:16:27 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

[4]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Feb 2000 18:07:48 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

[5]     From:   Meg Powers Livingston <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 14 Feb 2000 21:44:06 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Saints & Sinners

[6]     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tues, 15 Feb 2000 12:39:29 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 12:50:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.0304 Saints & Sinners
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

On saints and sinners, I would suggest a sonnet.

"Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth" or "Two loves I have of
comfort and despair."

Cleo Laine and John Dankworth set some of the sonnets, though I don't
recall if they set these.

Best, David Richman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kris McDermott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 13:44:06 EST
Subject: 11.0304 Saints & Sinners
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

It isn't exactly about saints and sinners, but Sonnet 144, "Two loves I
have, of comfort and despair...," refers to the friend as "good angel"
and "saint" and the mistress as a "foul devil," "fiend" and "bad
angel."  Though not religious in topic, it might still be appropriate.
All  sonnets can be sung to the tune of "Fortune My Foe."

Kris McDermott
Central Michigan Univ.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 14:16:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.0304 Saints & Sinners
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

Bernice asks for passages re saints and sinners. Might I suggest looking
at some of the Shakespeare based musicals? In Boys from Syracuse, the
song "He and She" is a possibility, with this conclusion: "And when they
died and went to heaven / All the angels moved to hell." Then there's
the rock musical, Catch My Soul, which was made into a film, Santa Fe
Satan: surely there's some material there?

On a more classical note, there's Iago's "Credo" in Verdi's Otello.

Fran Teague <http://www.arches.uga.edu/~fteague>

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 18:07:48 -0500
Subject: 11.0304 Saints & Sinners
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

I'll bet many of us point to the wooing sonnet between Romeo and Juliet
when they first meet. Acording to Romeo in best courtly losve fashion,
she is the saint and he not only the Palmer but the sinner - "give me my
sin again ".

Mary Jane

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Meg Powers Livingston <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 21:44:06 -0800
Subject:        Re: Saints & Sinners

>Does anyone know if there is a song or a passage from Sh that could
>become a song on the topic of saints and sinners? The director of a
>student production at Manhattanville would like to end his show with
>such a song.

The first place I would look is Measure for Measure-- lots of sinners
and would-be saints there.

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tues, 15 Feb 2000 12:39:29 -0500
Subject: 11.0304 Saints & Sinners
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

Bernice Kliman asked:

> Does anyone know if there is a song or a passage from Sh that could
> become a song on the topic of saints and sinners? The director of a
> student production at Manhattanville would like to end his show with
> such a song.

"The rain it raineth" from _Twelfth NIght_? Or perhaps a setting of
Lancelot's deliberations with his angel and devil in _The Merchant of
Venice_? Neither is explicitly about saints and sinners, but both
capture the flavor of the mixed nature of life.

Chris Gordon

Re: Knock Knock

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0316  Tuesday, 15 February 2000.

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 09:51:09 -0800
Subject: 11.0303 Re: Knock Knock
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0303 Re: Knock Knock

Skip Nicholson asks:

> And does the name of Macbeth's servant, Seyton, allude
> to Satan himself?  Is the idea that Macbeth has stooped so low that the
> devil serves him?

There's the more subtle possibility that Seyton is the Mephistopheles to
Macbeth's Fautus, or perhaps the Bormann to his Hitler.  He _appears_ as
a servant, in other words, but Macbeth might actually be serving him.
That said, I can't find Macbeth following any of Seyton's suggestions as
he follows the witches'.

Cheers,
Se


King James Bible

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0314  Tuesday, 15 February 2000.

From:           Kathleen Breen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 14 Feb 2000 18:13:21 -0500
Subject:        King James Bible

In answer to Alex Houck's comment about "proof" of Shakespeare's work on
the King James Bible, consider Psalm 46.   It is suggested that
Shakespeare planted his signature in Psalm 46, since he was 46 years old
in 1610 when he worked on the bible. Count 46 words in from the top and
you get "shake." Count backward 46 words from the bottom and you get
"spear."

Psalm 46

God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.
Therefore will we not fear, though the earth be removed,
And though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea;
Though the waters thereof roar and be troubled,
Though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah.
There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God,
The holy place of the tabernacle of the Most High.
God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved:
God shall help her, and that right early.
The heathen raged, the kingdoms were moved:
He uttered his voice, the earth melted.
The Lord of Hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah.
Come, behold the works of the Lord,
What desolations he has made on earth;
He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth he breaketh the bow,
And cutteth the spear in sunder;
He burneth the chariot in the fire.
Be still, and know that I am God.
I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth.
The Lord of Hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge.

I don't know if this constitutes "proof," but it's interesting.

Kate Breen

[Editor's Note: This topic has been discussed a number of times in the
past on SHAKSPER. To locate those discussions use the SEARCH function.
-HMC]

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