2000

Books Needed

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0278  Wednesday, 9 February 2000.

From:           Mark Perew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 21:23:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Books Needed

In 1994 I was privileged to have a small hand in the design and planning
of a new junior high school for the urban city of Santa Ana,
California.  Despite opposition from a vocal minority and a series of
delays, that school facility has now become a physical reality.  This
fall 1300 young teenagers will begin classes on this modern campus that
is wired for the internet, equipped to teach both music and technology,
provided with modern science classrooms, and so on.

But, (isn't there always a "but") it is likely to open its doors with a
nearly empty library.

If you have any old textbooks, unused reference materials or other
books, would you please consider donating them to Mendez Fundamental
Intermediate School?  Books which may be too advanced for grades 6
through 8 may still be useful as reference books for teachers.

If you have any questions, or if you have books to donate, please send
me private email

Thank you.

Atomic Shakespeare (MOONLIGHTING Shrew)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0277  Wednesday, 9 February 2000.

From:           Douglas M Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 16:59:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Atomic Shakespeare

I'm told by a representative of the BRAVO TV network that "Atomic
Shakespeare" will be shown on BRAVO at 12 noon and 7 PM on February 15,
Eastern Standard Time.  This is episode #32 of the MOONLIGHTING TV
series, a parody of THE TAMING OF THE SHREW; the show is one hour long.
It's very clever, a delight for fans of the series and of the Zeffirelli
film adaptation of SHREW.  So far as I know, it has never been released
on video for sale.  This is one worth taping.

Some additional Information:
Director, Will MacKenzie
Writer, Ron Osborn and Jeff Reno
First aired November 25, 1986

Cheers,
Douglas Lanier
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: New Globe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0275  Wednesday, 9 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Tom Reedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 12:30:40 -0600
        Subj:   Intellectual Property

[2]     From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wed, 9 Feb 2000 08:24:25 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0271 Re: New Globe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Reedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 12:30:40 -0600
Subject:        Intellectual Property

John Briggs wrote

>Perhaps I should point out that the correct name of the rebuilt Globe is
>"Shakespeare's Globe" (presumably TM - the names "Globe" and "New Globe"
>must be TMs of other theatres or organisations, which is a pretty strong
>argument against intellectual property...).

This touches on a question I've been wondering about for some time.  How
long do British copyrights last, and how can British governmental
agencies hold copyrights?

Here in the US, the government cannot hold a copyright (especially not
of public records such as marriage licenses, wills, etc), and copyrights
lapse some years after the death of the creator or artist (75 years, I
believe).

The  Diocese of Worcester, which holds the marriage bond,  informed me
that if images of the bond were reproduced a royalty would have to be
paid to them, the amount depending upon how many copies were
distributed.  Does anybody on this list have any insight into how they
can hold a copyright for more than 400 years?

Tom Reedy

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wed, 9 Feb 2000 08:24:25 -0000
Subject: 11.0271 Re: New Globe
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0271 Re: New Globe

Hmm, I think this supports my argument rather than yours, because I
would say, "Why should they, just by buying (or renting) the name?"

"Intellectual property is intellectual theft," Discuss.

Did Ethel the Pirate's Daughter take shorthand?

By several associations of ideas:  what would have happened if Karl Marx
had decided to open retail stores with his friend Friedrich Engels?
Would there now be a chain called Marx & Engels?  Would it be a workers'
co-operative like the John Lewis Partnership?

John Briggs

Re: Money and Prostitution

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0276  Wednesday, 9 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 08 Feb 2000 11:47:55 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0270 Re: Money and Prostitution

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 16:06:50 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0270 Re: Money and Prostitution


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 08 Feb 2000 11:47:55 -0800
Subject: 11.0270 Re: Money and Prostitution
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0270 Re: Money and Prostitution

One useful point that's been raised in this discussion of money and
prostitution is the difficulty of finding a "basket" of goods that can
be used to measure the value of currency against in divergent historical
periods.  The Economist, as a (IMHO) fascinating example, uses a big
mac, since it's standardized.  Unfortunately, their index only covers
the last few years, and only in countries with McDonald restaurants.

One thing that I think we can agree upon is that we're all very much
better off than our 16th century counterparts.  The sheer difficulty of
finding a parallel with bread as a staple of the diet illustrates this.
A sensible method, in my mind, is to measure (using wills, inventories,
etc.) the consumption of sixteenth-century unskilled labourers, measure
its value according to prices now, and compare it with the consumption
of their year 2000 colleagues.

Cheers,
Se


Re: Lady Macbeth's Death

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0274  Wednesday, 9 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 14:52:46 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 08 Feb 2000 11:52:45 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 8 Feb 2000 14:52:46 -0300
Subject: 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death

It was, indeed, a treat to realize, once, that sleepwalking in Macbeth
is associated with madness, but it needn't all the time. I had the
amazing experience to have a class with an extraordinary number of
sleepwalkers (more than 5!) who reacted against my use of madness as
associated to a sleep disturbance. Are we going by Elizabethan standards
when we teach this, or, even more anachronistically, by Victorian ones?

Nora Kreimer
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 08 Feb 2000 11:52:45 -0800
Subject: 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0265 Re: Lady Macbeth's Death

There's an interesting comparison to be drawn, I think, between Lady
Macbeth's supposed suicide, and Cordelia's death which was also to be
ascribed to her own despair by Edmund's order.  Somebody (I thought it
was Stanley Cavell, but can't find a reference in "The Avoidance of
Love") points out that in Shakespeare's sources, Cordelia also commits
suicide.  If my memory of the argument is correct, Shakespeare is
therefore defending Cordelia against the imputation of despair.
Shakespeare finds this imputation in the sources, but then ascribes it
to the evil character who wants to cover up his crime.

Does anyone remember where this argument occurs?  Chambers points
towards the fact that all Shakespeare's sources would have concurred in
Cordelia's suicide, but somebody else made the further argument that
Shakespeare is defending her against Edmund's lie.

Cheers,
Se


Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.