2000

Re: A Musical Tempest in Seoul

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0378  Tuesday, 22 February 2000.

From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Feb 2000 07:10:10 +1000
Subject: 11.0371 Re: A Musical Tempest in Seoul
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0371 Re: A Musical Tempest in Seoul

Brother Anthony writes:

>Sorry, I was offered a chance to see it, but chose a cup of tea
>instead.  I was at the Opera House one evening as it started and it
>looked (and sounded) extremely Kitsch. A British stage-managing friend
>who did see it used the word 'mish-mash' of its style ('a bit of all
>sorts of things') and assured me that it owed virtually nothing to
>Shakespeare so far as he could tell (there was a translation into
>English projected overhead in case anyone needed it). Its cast and
>director are Names in Korea, there was enough official funding for them
>not to need a paying audience so that almost everyone came with a free
>ticket, and the production was not covered in either of the
>English-language newspapers or I would give you a URL. C'est la vie.

Thank you for the report!  "Kitsch" was the word which occurred to me
when I heard of the production; I wondered whether it would be
"so-bizarre-it's-wonderful" kitsch or just, as your friend reported, a
mish-mash.  "Official funding"-what kind of official funding?  Would
such an enterprise be government subsidized?  Or just backed by the
entertainment industry so as to publicize the cast?

It sounds like a cup of tea was a wise choice.  Thanks again for
indulging my curiosity!

Karen Peterson-Kranz
University of Guam

A Book on Warner's Titus?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0377  Tuesday, 22 February 2000.

From:           Michael Yawney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 13:22:28 -0500
Subject:        A Book on Warner's Titus?

A few years ago, I read though a book about Deborah Warner's Titus
Andronicus in a used bookstore. The book was about that production and
its rehearsal process and dealt with no other production. I spent a long
time with the book and found myself thinking about it much in subsequent
years.

However, I cannot find it now. I do not remember the title or the author
so searching has been impossible. It may also not have been sold in the
US.

Does anyone in the listserv know this book, its author, and/or its
publisher? Or where it can be purchased?

Re: Pound of Flesh

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0375  Tuesday, 22 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2000 11:22:22 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2000 18:49:50 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 11:22:22 -0300
Subject: 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh

A good approach to Shylock appears in: Gross, John, 1992, _SHYLOCK - A
Legend & Its Legacy-_, USA: Simon & Schuster.

It's divided into 3 parts, and the second one includes references to
historical interpretations and impersonations, as its title
"Interpretations" indicates.

Regards
Nora Kreimer
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 18:49:50 -0500
Subject: 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0362 Re: Pound of Flesh

In the Genealogy of Morals, Nietzsche refers to "older civilizations" in
an attempt to explain how the "notion of an equivalency between damage
and pain" originally arose.  "...the answer is, briefly: it arose in the
contractual relation between creditor and debtor..." He then goes on to
illustrate his point with examples including the fact that, in these
older civilizations, the

"creditor...had the right to inflict all manner of indignity and pain on
the body of the debtor.  For example, he could cut out an amount of
flesh proportionate to the amount of the debt, and we find, very early,
quite detailed legal assessments of the value of individual parts of the
body.  I consider it already a progress, proof of a freer, more
generous, more Roman conception of law, when the Twelve Tables decreed
that it made no difference how much or little, in such a case, the
creditor cut out-si plus minusve secuerunt, ne fraude esto."

Nietzsche must have read Portia, despite her name, as un-Roman and
something of a Tarquin.

Clifford Stetner

Re: A Hypertext Model

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0376  Tuesday, 22 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Maijan H. Al-Ruwaili <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2000 17:51:42 +0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0363 Re: A Hypertext Model

[2]     From:   Meg Powers Livingston <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Feb 2000 22:36:20 -0800
        Subj:   Re: A Hypertext Model


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Maijan H. Al-Ruwaili <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 17:51:42 +0300
Subject: 11.0363 Re: A Hypertext Model
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0363 Re: A Hypertext Model

> Scott Crozier (RE: SHK 11.0355 A Hypertext Model) wrote
>
> Although this is not the subject of our list, I would be more than a
> little worried if someone used the Prufrock hypertext as a model for
> hypertext on any Shakespeare.

I think the attempt to bring hypertext and Shakespeare's text seems to
be already underway; one should consult Siemens' article in Surfaces (I
have not read it yet; but it is worth looking into):

          VIII.106
          Raymond G. Siemens
          Shakesperean Apparatus? Explicit Textual
          Structures and the Implicit Navigation of
          Accumulated Knowledge

http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/revues/surfaces/

Maijan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Meg Powers Livingston <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 22:36:20 -0800
Subject:        Re: A Hypertext Model

For an outstanding web site that could usefully serve as a model for a
truly hypertext Shakespeare, see http://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton.  I'd
like to hear, off-line if that's more appropriate, what other teachers
of Ren. lit. (and I think many of us who teach Shakespeare probably also
teach Milton) think about this site.

Meg

Second-Hand Fighting and Monsters

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0374  Tuesday, 22 February 2000.

From:           Jimmy Jung <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Feb 2000 08:28:16 -0500
Subject:        Second-Hand Fighting and Monsters

I'm almost positive that somewhere in Shakespeare there are several
second-hand descriptions of an offstage combat.  But I spent a lot of
yesterday thumbing through the plays and could not seem to find one.

I also was looking for an instance where a character has met a monster
or mythological beast.  Of course the ideal circumstance would be a
character recalling a fight with a monster.

Jimmy Jung

PS: Yes,Titus has reached Washington DC; in just one theater, and I
haven't made it to that side of the city yet.  So I've been saving all
of your comments to look at after.

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