2000

Taymor's TITUS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0338  Wednesday, 16 February 2000.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, February 16, 2000
Subject:        Taymor's TITUS

Last night, I saw the Taymor TITUS.

All I can say right now is "PLEASE, PLEASE, SEE IT!" Travel any
reasonable distance and pay any ridiculous price, but see it.

The production is brilliantly conceived, directed, costumed, acted,
photographed, edited, and so on and so on. In fact, at this moment, I
feel that this was the finest Shakespeare film I have ever seen (I am,
of course, slightly sleep deprived, not usually staying up as late as I
did last night.).

The production choices were so right that I knew within about thirty
seconds into the film that I was going to thoroughly enjoy the next two
and a half plus hours.

I am planning to see it again weekend after this one and may change my
mind, but, in any case, this is the sort of film that deserves all of
the support it can get. I would even have supported a "Come see the
slasher Shakespeare" campaign if it would have broaden the theatergoing
base for this film.

I realize that the release of TITUS is limited - it only opened a few
days ago in Washington, D.C. - but this is a MUST see, an intelligent
and challenging production and not at all the Hollywood pap of such
releases as the recent Michael Hoffman MND.

You owe it to yourself and to the film industry to make every effort to
see the Taymor TITUS. If this film tanks in the box offices, not only
will we get fewer productions of this quality but Anthony Hopkins will
not get the Academy Award he deserves for his final performance.

Glowingly,
Hardy

Variety reviews LLL

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0337  Wednesday, 16 February 2000.

From:           Jerry Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 11:22:41 -0600
Subject:        Variety reviews LLL

There is a generally positive review of the Branagh "Love's Labours
Lost" on Yahoo's online excerpts from "Variety"  at
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000216/en/review-filmlabour_1.html .

Jerry Bangham

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
http://www.win.net/~kudzu/

Re: Saints & Sinners

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0335  Wednesday, 16 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 19:27:51 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0315 Re: Saints & Sinners

[2]     From:   Patricia Cooke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 16:37:28 +1200
        Subj:   SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 19:27:51 -0500
Subject: 11.0315 Re: Saints & Sinners
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0315 Re: Saints & Sinners

Kris McDermott noted:

>All  sonnets can be sung to the tune of "Fortune My Foe."

I found that "They that have power to hurt and will doe none" fits the
tune of "I'll take you home again, Kathleen."  Since several have
mentioned "Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth" or "Two loves I
have of comfort and despair,"  I ran those thru the tune and find that
they fit too.

As to the saints & sinners question, was there ever any actual music for
Fulke Greville's Chorus Sacerdotum?   It's a paraphrase of Romans 7,
"The good that I would I do not . . ."

Nancy Charlton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Cooke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wed, 16 Feb 2000 16:37:28 +1200
Subject: Saints & Sinners
Comment:        SHK 11.0304 Saints & Sinners

Cleo Laine and  John Dankworth  recorded " Cleo Laine - Shakespeare and
all
that Jazz" on Phillips 6382 014  241 in 1972 International Series.  The
sonnets included were

18      Shall I compare thee

23      As an imperfect actor on the stage/Who with his fear is put
besides his part

24      Mine eye hath played the painter and hath stelled/Thy beauty's
form in table of my heart

40      Take all my loves, my love, yea take them all/What hast thou
then more than thou hadst before?

147     My love is as a fever, longing still/For that which nurseth the
disease as well as

If music be the food of love; O mistress Mind (sic); Winter (LLL); It
was a lover and his lass; Dunsinane Blues;  Blow, blow thou winter wind;
Witches, fair and foul (Macbeth & MND); Fear no More; Sigh no more
Ladies; and The Compleat Works.

I don't think any of these is quite what you're looking for?

Patricia Cooke, Secretary & Editor
Shakespeare Globe Centre New Zealand Inc
97 Elizabeth Street Wellington 6001 New Zealand PH/FAX 64 4 3856743

Re: Seyton

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0336  Wednesday, 16 February 2000.

[1]     From:   Meg Powers Livingston <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 00:24:51 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Knock Knock

[2]     From:   Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wed, 16 Feb 2000 09:40:14 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0316 Re: Knock Knock


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Meg Powers Livingston <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Feb 2000 00:24:51 -0800
Subject:        Re: Knock Knock

>And does the name of Macbeth's servant, Seyton, allude
>to Satan himself? Is the idea that Macbeth has stooped so low that the
>devil serves him?

I've had students ask this question several times, especially as part of
an assignment where they must compare two productions of the same play.
The students who work on Macbeth often call attention to the fact that
most productions available on video either omit the servant's name or
pronounce it See-ton rather than Say-ton.  The only production I can
think of, off hand, that pronounces the name Say-ton is Welles', where
the allusion to Satan fits in well with the Catholic imagery that
gradually accrues to Malcolm throughout the film.

Can anyone comment on how the name might most commonly have been
pronounced in the period?

Thanks,
Meg

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wed, 16 Feb 2000 09:40:14 -0300
Subject: 11.0316 Re: Knock Knock
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0316 Re: Knock Knock

This is not the first time that I read someone play around with the name
of Seyton. My personal feeling regarding this issue is that there was
evil in Macbeth long before he was a king and long before Seyton was his
attendant.  May I, with due respect, wherein lies the basis for this
argumentation?

Regards
Nyke

Moonlighting, "Atomic Shakespeare"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0334  Wednesday, 16 February 2000.

From:           Douglas M Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Feb 2000 23:14:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Moonlighting, "Atomic Shakespeare"

My apologies to those I unwittingly misled about the broadcast of
Moonlighting's "Atomic Shakespeare."  Bravo TV's viewer relations
personnel gave me the incorrect date of its broadcast and, alas, it was
wrong.  (Their website is also wrong.)  At least in my area of the
country, the actual date of broadcast was apparently last Friday.  I'm
very sorry for the misinformation.

The same Bravo employee also informed me that "Atomic Shakespeare" is
tentatively scheduled for rebroadcast on BRAVO TV in May (no date set),
but given Bravo's reliability all I can say is "check your local
listings."

On a brighter note, Anchor Bay video has announced plans to release
episodes of MOONLIGHTING, including "Atomic Shakespeare," on DVD and
video.  According to a contact at Anchor Bay, "Atomic Shakespeare" is
tentatively scheduled for a summer or fall release.

Cheers,
Douglas Lanier
University of New Hampshire

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