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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: January ::
Re: Henry V (and Branagh)
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0010  Monday, 3 January 2000.

[1]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Dec 1999 16:23:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)

[2]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Dec 1999 16:09:10 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)

[3]     From:   Judy Lewis <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Dec 1999 23:48:00 +1300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Dec 1999 16:23:15 -0500
Subject: 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)

Actually, Shakespeare's true motivation was a desire to be selected as
the centerfold "Playwright of the Month" by Playhouse magazine.

Dana (Shilling)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Matthews Craig <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Dec 1999 16:09:10 -0600
Subject: 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)

Clifford Stetner writes:

<It may be that money was not so ignoble a motive in the <age of
incipient
<social mobility.  It was, after all, the only alternative to <birth as
a
<measure of social status, and as such could be taken as <a God given
sign
<of true noblesse, one of the overriding principles of <secular humanism
<to be opposed to the principle of primogeniture, <increasingly seen
<throughout the Renaissance as a source of decay.

<Incidentally, I believe that the argument against <primogeniture (and
by
<implication, in favor of the pursuit of money) was <analogized and
<encoded into the ideology of the Reformation (i.e. the <titled Roman
<Church vs. the true noblesse of emergent Anglicanism).

This version of the Protestant ethic had its origin is 20th century
American scholarship, not 16th century men who loved virtue.  I don't
think, as a Christian, that acquiring money is completely antithetical,
to all Christian thought (see Luke 16: 9, "And I tell you, make friends
for yourselves by means of unrighteous mammon, so that when it fails
they may receive you into the eternal habitations"). It would seem that
the LOVE of money as an end in itself is corrupting (see 1Timothy 6:10:
"For the love of money is the root of all evils; it is through this
craving that some have wondered away from the faith and pierced their
hearts with many pangs" ).

I never knew the principle of primogeniture was the foundation of
anything, except hereditary kingship. Love of God is the primary
commandment, and I believe anyone in our time looking at any Renaissance
literature finds so many references to this mode of thought (largely
unknown in the 20th century) that he is lost unless he has some
familiarity PRACTICING it.  Hence the problems of reading literature
created in a religiously based society from the perspective of one not
religiously based.

Judy Craig

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judy Lewis <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Dec 1999 23:48:00 +1300
Subject: 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2296 Re: Henry V (and Branagh)

I don't know what all this fuss about money and so-called 'purer'
motives is about.  Michelangelo sculpted for money.  Raphael and
Leonardo and Rembrandt painted for money.  Mozart composed for money.
Even geniuses have to eat.

Judy Lewis
 

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