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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: January ::
More Shakespeare References
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0048  Monday, 10 January 2000.

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <
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        Date:   Saturday, 08 Jan 2000 16:31:08 -0500
        Subj:   More Shakespeare References

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <
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        Date:   Sunday, 09 Jan 2000 15:44:00 -0500
        Subj:   Mansfield Park


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
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Date:           Saturday, 08 Jan 2000 16:31:08 -0500
Subject:        More Shakespeare References

In the film _The Talented Mr. Ripley_ contains several Shakespeare
references.  When Tom Ripley has Dickie Greenleaf sign his name, he
gives him a postcard with Macbeth's lines "Stars hide your fires . . "
written on it.  Just before this moment, Dickie says to Tom, "I can't
believe you brought Shakespeare, but no clothes."  Later in the film, a
restaurant named _Otello_ is mentioned several times.

An episode of the TV melodrama _Providence_, a series about two single
late 30 to early 40 something sisters, broadcast Friday January 7, 2000,
8 p.m. begins with a replay of the balcony scene from _Romeo and
Juliet_. Sid (a medical Dr.) having a fantasy about being Juliet to
Romeo (as if they were real people) that is interrupted by her mother.
Sid and Romeo talk to each other in Elizabethanese. The mother throws
cold water on the fantasy by interjecting comments like "But it's the
twelfth century.  What abut the Black Death, the plague?" Sid insists
that it is "my fantasy."  But the fantasy does not go forward.  Cut to
credits and commercial break.  The episode is structured by a double
plot.  One plot involves the other sister (a single Mom) going to a
costume singles party as Bo Peep and meeting Zoro . He kisses her before
inexplicably dashing off.  He turns out to be the bartender, but she
doesn't know that.  The other plot involves a psychic dying who cared
for an illiterate grandson whose parents were deported when he was very
young (and told him never to speak so he would not be deported too).  He
has spent his life copying paintings by various (mostly Renaissance)
master painters (she finds him in a pose like Michaelangelo's Adam when
Adam is given life by God on the Sistine Chapel; the parallel is
established when the camera cuts to the ceiling and we see the Creation
panel).  Turns out--in predictably Oedipal fashion--that the guy (named
Leo) who has developed a crush on the Doc (who is a double for a Mom
whose face he cannot remember) also has a brain tumor and the operation
to remove it will leave him blind.  The Dr. advises him to save his
life, but he decides not to have the operation so he can complete a
painting of her and do other paintings (even if he has only two years
more to live).
At the end, he asks her if she would go out with him if the situation
were different, and after saying she never dates patients, she says that
were he older and not her patient, she would date him.  She adds
"parting is such were sorrow." He says "What?"  and she replies, "Oh,
nothing."

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 09 Jan 2000 15:44:00 -0500
Subject:        Mansfield Park

The recent film adaptation of Austen's novel, Fanny Price's horse is
named Shakespeare.  Don't recall that that is the case in the novel.
 

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