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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: January ::
Re: Rat Plots
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0072  Thursday, 13 January 2000.

[1]     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Jan 2000 16:46:16 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0060 Re: Rat Plots

[2]     From:   Drew Whitehead <
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        Date:   Thu, 13 Jan 2000 10:02:00 +1000 (GMT+1000)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0060 Re: Rat Plots

[3]     From:   John Savage <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Jan 2000 09:11:37 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 11.0060 Re: Rat Plots


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 12 Jan 2000 16:46:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.0060 Re: Rat Plots
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0060 Re: Rat Plots

The Merchant of Venice is set against what I perceive as a
pathologically selfish and self-absorbed society.  These Christians
think little of squandering the money they don't have on themselves, not
on others.  Thus, it makes perfect, saddening sense to me that none of
the Venetian Christians would come to Antonio's aid.  David Richman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Drew Whitehead <
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Date:           Thu, 13 Jan 2000 10:02:00 +1000 (GMT+1000)
Subject: 11.0060 Re: Rat Plots
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0060 Re: Rat Plots

>I know that "COMEDY OF ERRORS" is by no means a serious play - but it
>always bothers me that Antipholus of Syracuse and Dromio of Syracuse
>have gone after their identical twins with identical names - that's the
>whole purpose of their journey - and yet when they get to a town where
>strangers see to recognize them, it never once occurs to them that they
>might have finally found the twins they've been searching for.

Proue true imagination, oh proue true,
That I deere brother, be now tane for you.

Twelth Night (3.4)

This is the principal difference between The Comedy of Errors and
Twelfth Night.  Viola immediately recognises that she might be being
mistaken for her brother even though she believes him dead.  C of E is a
farce, pure and simple, the play only works if the principal characters
don't think but react.  Its pie in the face stuff, but it works
wonderfully on stage.

                        Our reasons are not prophets
                        When oft our fancies are
                        (The Two Noble Kinsmen 5.3)

Drew Whitehead
Dept. of English
University of Queensland

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Savage <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Jan 2000 09:11:37 -0500
Subject: Re: Rat Plots
Comment:        SHK 11.0060 Re: Rat Plots

Richard Nathan wrote:

I know that "COMEDY OF ERRORS" is by no means a serious play - but it
always bothers me that Antipholus of Syracuse and Dromio of Syracuse
have gone after their identical twins with identical names - that's the
whole purpose of their journey - and yet when they get to a town where
strangers see to recognize them, it never once occurs to them that they
might have finally found the twins they've been searching for.

Surely logic and common sense are not what should be employed when
analyzing C of E.  <g>
 

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