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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: January ::
Re: Ducats and Daughters
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0149  Monday, 24 January 2000.

[1]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Jan 2000 13:20:47 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0141 Re: Ducats and Daughters

[2]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig <
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        Date:   Sunday, 23 Jan 2000 17:44:46 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0141 Re: Ducats and Daughters


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Jan 2000 13:20:47 -0500
Subject: 11.0141 Re: Ducats and Daughters
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0141 Re: Ducats and Daughters

MV V.i.226:

I will become as liberal as you;
I'll not deny him anything I have,
No, not my body nor my husband's bed...

Portia expects little thanks from her husband for this offer of
"liberality", so women's generosity was not always a value.

Dana (Shilling)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Matthews Craig <
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Date:           Sunday, 23 Jan 2000 17:44:46 -0600
Subject: 11.0141 Re: Ducats and Daughters
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0141 Re: Ducats and Daughters

Robin Hamilton writes:

<Both concepts (generous hospitality and sexual licence) <would seem to
be
<operative in Leontes words on his wife's behaviour <towards the
beginning
<of WT:

                    <<This entertainment
<<May a free face put on it, derive a liberty
<<From heartiness, from bounty, fertile bosom,
<<And well become the agent.  'T may, I grant.
<<But to be paddling palms and pinching fingers ...

I agree that the concepts of generous hospitality and sexual license
seemed to haunt Shakespeare in his late plays. In Cymbeline, Innogen's
curt dismissal to Iachimo in 1.7 "Let me hear no more" (line 117) melts
under his barrage of rhetoric to a sweet "All's well, sir: take my power
i' th' court for yours" (line 179) just sixty lines later.  She would
"pawn her honor" (line 194) for the safety of the jewels in the casket
he wants protected while the lecher that the casket really contains
actually does pawn her honor with her husband in the next act.  I have
always thought it strange that she is reading the Metamorphoses instead
of her husband's letter that fateful night in 1.7.

Judy Craig
 

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