2000

Re: African-American Shakespearean Companies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0042  Monday, 10 January 2000.

[1]     From:   Fiona P McNeill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 8 Jan 2000 11:05:12 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0038 African American Shakespearean Companies

[2]     From:   Kristen McDermott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 8 Jan 2000 11:39:05 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0038 African American Shakespearean Companies


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fiona P McNeill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 8 Jan 2000 11:05:12 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.0038 African American Shakespearean Companies
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0038 African American Shakespearean Companies

The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts has a catalog
listing the collection of playbills and reviews of New York productions.
Their number is 212 870 1630. Try also the Schomburg Center for Research
in Black Culture at 212 491 2200. I'd be interested to hear what you
find.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kristen McDermott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 8 Jan 2000 11:39:05 EST
Subject: 11.0038 African American Shakespearean Companies
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0038 African American Shakespearean Companies

Of course, Errol Hill's "Shakespeare in Sable" is still (I believe)
considered the definitive study.  But, in addition to the many scholarly
sources I am sure will be recommended, don't miss Carlyle Brown's
well-researched and entertaining 1993 play, "The African Company
Performs Richard III."  It's available through Samuel French, but may
also be commercially published.

Shakespearean Soundtracks

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0041  Saturday, 8 January 2000.

From:           Hugh Davis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 07 Jan 2000 10:38:33 EST
Subject:        Shakespearean Soundtracks

Is there a collection with the film music (in particular the songs) of
Shakespearean adaptations?  I know soundtracks can be purchased for
individual films, but has any sort of "retrospective" been put together?

Thanks,
Hugh Davis

WB Popular and Lady Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0039  Saturday, 8 January 2000.

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 06 Jan 2000 21:05:29 -0500
Subject:        WB Popular and Lady Macbeth

In an episode of the Warner Brothers TV show Popular broadcast Thursday
evening, Jan 6, 2000, there was a reference to Lady Macbeth's mad
scene-the "out damn spot" line.  The episode was about several students
cheating on a mid-term exam.  One student, a reporter named Sam, is on
to them, and runs into another student named Brooke McQueen in the
girl's bathroom as Brooke is drying off her hands (these girls hate each
other; also, their parents, who are both single, happen to be sleeping
together and for some reason, this grosses both girls out; at the end of
the episode, the parents tell the girls that the y are all moving into
together the following week).  Sam, the non-cheater, says to Brooke, the
cheater-"you can wash them and wash them and they'll never come clean."
And Brooke replies "Oh, thank you for your Lady Macbeth reference."

Re: Goofy Answers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0040  Saturday, 8 January 2000.

From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 7 Jan 2000 17:40:09 +1000
Subject: 11.0031 Re: Goofy Answers
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0031 Re: Goofy Answers

This isn't a goofy test answer...just a goofy student story.

Last year, after making a number of really strange comments, it came out
that one of my students had thought that since we in the faculty were
called "Dr. This" and "Dr. That," that we were all medical doctors, and
that it was required that all university professors go to medical school
first before pursuing our further specialty studies.

Scalpel, please.

Karen Peterson-Kranz
University of Guam

African American Shakespearean Companies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0038  Saturday, 8 January 2000.

From:           Peter Webster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 6 Jan 2000 19:00:11 EST
Subject:        African American Shakespearean Companies

Has anyone information, research sources or books to suggest on the
subject of African American Shakespearean Companies in the 19th or early
20th Centuries?

I know there were touring companies that performed the works of WS, and
I believe that there was an African American production of Macbeth in
New York City at roughly the same time the famous Anglo "Dueling
Macbeths" were causing riots.

I believe the city authorities shut down the popular African American
offering because of racial controversy, and that performances were then
held in unannounced venues, advertised only by word of mouth.

You may post your thoughts or reply to me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Thank you in advance for your help and inspiration!

Peter Webster
Artistic Director, Mappamundi

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