2000

Re: Seeking Enlightenment

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0159  Tuesday, 25 January 2000.

[1]     From:   Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 11:13:12 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 09:04:33 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment

[3]     From:   Simon Malloch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Jan 2000 01:17:34 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment

[4]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 13:06:06 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment

[5]     From:   Jefferson Cronin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Jan 2000 07:57:10 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment

[6]     From:   Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 23:07:57 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 11:13:12 -0500
Subject: 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment

>> What exactly is the benefit of knowing about pornographic versions of
>> Shakespeare's works? or that a current Penthouse centerfold identifies
>> herself with Juliet?

Well, I don't really know, but I suspect the same guy who penned that
immortal line:

"O, Romeo, that she were, O that she were
An open-arse, thou a pop'rin pear!"

might find such "knowledge" amusing.

Norman J. Myers, Professor Emeritus
Theatre Department
Bowling Green State University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 09:04:33 -0800
Subject: 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0146 Re: Seeking Enlightenment

Gabriel Egan writes, courageously:

>The benefit is a comforting masculinist reassurance that despite 30
>years of feminism, abuse victims can still be coerced into degrading
>poses to gratify the infantile sexual power fantasies of adult men.

Would a gay production of MND be better?  What about pornography that
aims at a female audience?

>A tenuous link with Shakespeare and contemporary culture gives this
>wank-material an intellectual gloss.

Alternatively, it might comfortingly reduce intellectual material to
wank-material, making it a lot less challenging.  It strikes me that
reducing the world to wank-material seems to be a basic goal of
advertising.  Been in a magazine store recently?

Cheers,
Se


Re: sig.

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0158  Tuesday, 25 January 2000.

[1]     From:   Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 16:03:40 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

[2]     From:   Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 10:41:52 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

[3]     From:   William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 11:13:50 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

[4]     From:   Herman Asarnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 08:53:55 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

[5]     From:   Katherine West Scheil <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 16:57:59 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

[6]     From:   Jim Lusardi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Jan 2000 15:48:50 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marti Markus <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 16:03:40 +0100
Subject: 11.0152 Q: sig.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

> At the end of citations to early modern books, one often sees the
> abbreviation sig. or sigs. followed by numbers and letters.  Can someone
> explain this?
>
> Allan Blackman

OED: SIGNATURE, 6a:
A letter or figure, a set or combination of letters or figures, placed
by the printer at the foot of the first page (and frequently on one or
more of the succeeding pages) of every sheet in a book for the purpose
of showing the order in which these are to be placed or bound. ABB: sig.
sig. MM

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 10:41:52 -0500
Subject: 11.0152 Q: sig.
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

In early printing, a sheet of paper (usually 17 x 13.5 inches) was
printed both sides; then folded once, twice, thrice, or four times, to
make pages.  This sheet (and the resulting pages) is called a
"signature," and usually identified by a signature mark at the beginning
of each sheet.

So a signature mark is a way of locating material, like a page reference
in modern books.

Probably the most concise explanation is ion Ronald McKerrow's Intro to
Bibliogaphy, page 164 (I don't have the sig number).

I recall that Hinman also has a good concise explanation, but I cannot
locate it at the moment.

Cheers,
Ron Dwelle

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 11:13:50 +0000
Subject: 11.0152 Q: sig.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

Early printed books quite often have errors in pagination or no
pagination at all (I believe the first edition of Shakespeare's Sonnets
has no pagination).  Hence, the modern use of p. and pp. is replaced
with signature designations which are always far more accurate.  Thus,
the third page of the second gathering of a quarto signed A, B, C, etc.
would be cited as: sig. B2r  (sorry, the "r" should be superscript but I
can't manage that on my machine).  This would mean the third page,
second recto, front side of second leaf, of the second gathering in the
book.  This method of reference allows one to more accurately cite the
contents of early printed book.  I trust I make myself opaque?

William Proctor Williams

[Editor's Note: Indeed, Shakespeare's Sonnets that includes a Lover's
Complaint is not paginated. See
http://library.utoronto.ca/www/utel/ret/shakespeare/1609inti.html -HMC]

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Herman Asarnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 08:53:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 11.0152 Q: sig.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

Here's something on "signature" vis a vis early modern books.  (I've
lifted it from my essay "Fishing the Shelves" (South Dakota Review,
Summer 1996):

"Signature" in book making has a definition asserting sequence and
change rather than the permanence of a phrase like "one's mark."

In the earlier days of printing, when the pages of books were printed
and collated and sewn together by hand, a bound book consisted of sheets
of pages sewn together.  Each such group of pages was once a single
sheet of paper that was folded, then sewn with one or more other sheets
into the spine of a cloth or leather binding, then cut for reading.
(Many of us still remember the occasional book needing to have its pages
cut before it could be read.)   Sheets of sewn-together pages were
called quires, and the first page of each sheet that helped form a quire
of sheets had printed at the bottom a letter of the alphabet termed its
signature.  Thus the printer and his boy, having set aside to dry the
still wet sheets from the press, would be able to collate the sheets
properly as they lay scattered about the shop.  Another feature to help
this sorting of sheets and pages was the catchword, the first word of a
page printed in the bottom right-hand corner of the preceding page.
Later, whoever was to bind the book would read the signatures and
catchwords and be able to sew together the quires, and later sew the
quires consecutively into the binding.

--Herman Asarnow

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Katherine West Scheil <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 16:57:59 +0000
Subject: 11.0152 Q: sig.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

Sig. is the abbreviation for signature, the method used for organizing
sheets of a book, usually using letters of the alphabet.  See Philip
Gaskell, _A New Introduction to Bibliography_ (Oxford, 1972), p. 51-2.
Hope this helps.

Katherine West Scheil
University of Rhode Island

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Lusardi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 15:48:50 -0500
Subject: 11.0152 Q: sig.
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0152 Q: sig.

Dear Allan:

The reference is to signatures, which indicate how the book was put
together.  In early modern texts, signatures are often more reliable
than page numbers.  See R. B. McKerrow, An Introduction to Bibliography
for Literary Students, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1927.

Yours--Jim Lusardi, Shakespeare Bulletin

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0156  Monday, 24 January 2000.

From:           Rachana Sachdev <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 21 Jan 2000 15:56:46 -0500
Subject:        Call for Papers

Call for Papers

Women in Shakespeare's England

Fifth Annual Undergraduate Shakespeare Conference

April 14-15, 2000

Susquehanna University

Plenary Speaker: Dympna Callaghan, Syracuse University

Papers, workshops, interactive presentations, film analyses, and
performances that explore the position of women within the plays and
within early modern England are especially welcome. Special
consideration will be given to work on Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of
the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing, Troilus and Cressida, Othello,
Macbeth, Richard III and A Winter's Tale.

Highlights:
*       Shakespeare in Performance
*       Shakespeare and Film
*       Workshops on Individual Plays
*       Traditional Paper Sessions

Designed to foster scholarship at the undergraduate level, this
conference provides a forum where undergraduates may exchange ideas,
creatively rework texts, and present research in a semi-formal setting.

Papers should be about 7-9 pages long (reading time about 15 minutes).
Each workshop and performance will be allotted 25-40 minutes, and
leaders need to plan their ideas and activities accordingly. E-mail
submissions are welcome.

The conference will start at noon, Friday, April 14, and will include a
plenary speaker as well. Sessions will run through the day on Saturday,
and we will conclude with a post-conference party on Saturday evening.
Susquehanna University is covering the cost of registration for all
participants. Selinsgrove offers inexpensive accommodations, and some
room subsidies are available.

Please send one to two page abstracts by February 1 to:
Dr. Rachana Sachdev
514 University venue
Selinsgrove, PA 17870-1001
Phone:(570) 372-4200
e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

RENAISSANCE 2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0157  Monday, 24 January 2000.


From:           Christopher Mann <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Jan 2000 16:12:10 +0200
Subject:        RENAISSANCE 2000

RENAISSANCE 2000: FIFTH TRIENNIAL CONGRESS
OF THE SHAKESPEARE SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

Dear Colleague

This is a reminder for those who may still be making up their minds
whether or not to deliver a paper. We would welcome your abstracts by 15
February 2000.

A wide variety of topics have already been submitted. Our guest speakers
are as initially announced: Jonathan Bate, Meredith Skura and Thomas
Docherty.

Should you require assistance with funding for accommodation and travel
the Shakespeare Society of Southern Africa is able to endorse your
request with a written statement depending on the acceptance of your
paper by the selection committee. The abstract of your paper and a brief
CV should be sent to me, the convenor, for transmission to the
Conference Committee.

A copy of the initial invitation is pasted below. It includes the
conference website address. Online registration and other services are
available at that address.

To those in other countries who cannot come and have written to say so,
many thanks. We hope you will cross our shores for the next congress.

Yours sincerely,
Chris Mann
Convenor


COPY OF INITIAL LETTER OF INVITATION

Dear Colleague

I would like to invite you to attend and to contribute a paper to the

Triennial Congress of the Shakespeare Society of Southern Africa
entitled Renaissance 2000.

The event will provide delegates with an opportunity of re-examining the
renaissance and the literary and theatrical relations among Shakespeare
and his contemporaries.

The conference will take place from Monday evening 26 June to Wednesday
afternoon 28 June 2000. The guest speakers include Jonathan Bate
(Liverpool), Meredith Skura (Rice) and Thomas Docherty
(Kent-at-Canterbury).

Please note that the National Arts Festival of South Africa, held here
in Grahamstown, will begin the day after the conference ends. It

will include the launch of WordFest 2000, a new national festival of
language and literature. This could be of particular interest to some
delegates.

For more information on the conference and for online registration
please visit the conference webpage:
http://www.rhodes.ac.za/affiliates/isea/shake/conf/

Our local travel agent informs us that a stay in South Africa of eight
days more than halves the airfare.  Secondly, Rhodes University and KLM
have negotiated a discounted travel scheme. Should you require further
information about travel and touring, please contact Marian Lanham at:-
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Should you have any queries do not hesitate to contact me.

Yours sincerely,
Chris Mann
Convenor

PS While strenuous attempts have been made to contact those who work in
this field it has not been possible to obtain full coverage. It would
thus be appreciated if you would forward this email to others who might
find the conference or the events that follow it of value.  Thank you.

Stratford Study Group 2000 (revised)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0155  Monday, 24 January 2000.

From:           Joanne Walen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 22 Jan 2000 15:36:33 EST
Subject:        Stratford Study Group 2000 (revised)

The 5th annual Shakespeare in Stratford (UK): Text and Theater course is
set for 11-17 June, 2000, offering seminars on text and performance with
scholars from the Shakespeare Centre and Institute and actors from the
Royal Shakespeare Company, covering five plays. This season's plays in
Stratford are As You Like It, Comedy of Errors, Henry IV, Pt. 1, and
Sheridan's The Rivals and in London, either Coriolanus with Ralph
Fiennes, or The Tempest at the Globe with Vanessa Redgrave as Prospero.
The $795 fee covers lodging in Stratford-upon-Avon guesthouses, all
breakfasts, 4 dinners, all tickets, coaches, entrance and class fees,
but not airfare. Course is limited to 15 participants, on a first-come
basis. Contact: Joanne Walen, Shakespeare Express, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  for
further information and registration.

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