2000

First-last Names

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0656  Friday, 31 March 2000.

From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Mar 2000 10:21:56 -0500
Subject:        First-last Names

In Othello, I wonder why the character is sometimes called "Michael
Cassio" and sometimes "Cassio" (by other characters, not by the
playwright)? I also wonder why there are so few characters who are
referred to in "first name-last name" combos (Marc Antony, Launcelot
Gobbo). What were the conventions of address for Shakespeare?

Re: Photos of Shakespeare Statues?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0655  Friday, 31 March 2000.

From:           Susan Brock <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Mar 2000 14:33:31 +0100
Subject: Photos of Shakespeare Statues?
Comment:        SHK 11.0569 Photos of Shakespeare Statues?

Holy Trinity Church has its own web site which contains some photographs
of the interior of the church including the bust of Shakespeare:
http://stratford-upon-avon.org/bard.html

Susan Brock
Shakespeare Centre
Stratford-upon-Avon

Re: Romeo Must Die

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0653  Friday, 31 March 2000.

From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Mar 2000 11:08:40 +1000
Subject: 11.0612 Re: Romeo Must Die
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0612 Re: Romeo Must Die

I didn't read my email for a couple of days and so missed these
responses to my (rather hysterical) posting on this thread.  Sorry for
being out of sequence.

>My apologies if I offended in my haste to respond.  Please be assured
>that no harm was intended, certainly not against our dearly beloved
>Kurosawa-sama.
>
>Moshiwake arimasen
>
>Tanya

No apologies necessary...I was being overly prissy about terms.  For the
non-Japanese speakers on the list, "moshiwake arimasen" is an extremely
formal apology, meaning something like "there is no way I can
sufficiently apologize for the magnitude of what I have done."  Usually
it is reserved for occasions such as airline presidents apologizing to
the families of passengers killed in crashes...and even I, nitpicking
obsessive-compulsive that I am, realize that overlaps in film genre
definitions hardly require such graciousness (actually, if you say this
to a Japanese person with whom you have an intimate relationship, they
will think you're being sarcastic!).

Ah, how far afield one can travel from Shakespeare.  Allow me one more
digression, however.  Peter Hyland wrote:

>While Karen Peterson-Kranz is right to say that Kurosawa's Ran and
>Throne of Blood are not simply part of the "martial arts" genre, in
>suggesting that Tanya Gough is oversimplifying, she oversimplifies
>herself. Karen objected to Tanya's description of these films as "superb
>examples of Samurai translations", implying that samurai films are
>basically the same as martial arts films.  It might well be that that is
>what they have become, but the historical samurai culture contains a
>very complex mix of social, ethical, political and military
>relationships. Kurosawa knew this even if simple-minded martial artists
>don't, so Tanya's description is not so far off the mark.

Peter is, of course, correct in that I, too, was guilty of
oversimplification.  My undergraduate degree was a double major in
CompLit and Japanese; I subsequently studied in Japan, and later
returned to teach in a university there for a number of years.  I have
encountered so few people in the Shakespeare-early modern culture
community with any interest, let alone knowledge, of Japanese culture,
that I do tend to oversimplify in the mistaken belief that it is
necessary.  Peter is entirely accurate in his description of the
complexity of that aspect of Japanese culture which is sometimes
designated as "samurai."  (A better term, I think, is "bushido"- the way
of the warrior.)  In many ways, I have come to think that understanding
what we refer to as the "early modern period" in Europe may be enriched
by a more detailed understanding of the corresponding period in
Japan-not to mention Korea, China, and elsewhere in Asia.

Sorry, Hardy, for straying so far away from the list's constellation of
topics.

Karen Peterson-Kranz
University of Guam

Aretino and Romano

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0654  Friday, 31 March 2000.

From:           John Velz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 22:52:20 -0600
Subject:        Aretino and Romano

Gabriel Egan mentions the sixteen pleasures.  There is a very funny and
charming novel by that title by Robert Hellenga in which the pictures in
question are seen from the p.v. of a female library conservator from
Chicago who goes to Florence to rescue books from the Arno flood.  Here
pornography is the subject and most of the plot of the book, but a
charming novel comes of it and in the end the pornography produces
good.  I recommend the book.

John

Asta Nielsen in 'Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0652  Friday, 31 March 2000.

From:           Kevin De Ornellas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 31 Mar 2000 00:15:28 GMT
Subject: 11.0551 Asta Nielsen in 'Hamlet'
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0551 Asta Nielsen in 'Hamlet'

Mariam, I found out a couple of days ago that the Shakespeare Institute
Library has a copy of the silent Asta Nielsen 'Hamlet' on video.  To
watch that copy, you would have to go to Stratford-upon-Avon - a great
excuse for a short stay in Warwickshire!

Kevin De Ornellas B.A., M.A.
School of English
Queen's University
Belfast, Ireland
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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