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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: Pop Culture: Sandman
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0431  Thursday, 2 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Paul Franssen <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 01 Mar 2000 16:41:12 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

[2]     From:   Douglas M Lanier <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Mar 2000 11:09:09 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

[3]     From:   Deborah Selden <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Mar 2000 10:20:29 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

[4]     From:   Ellen Steiber <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Mar 2000 12:39:42 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

[5]     From:   Peter Paul Schnierer <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Mar 2000 18:44:43 +0100 (MET)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

[6]     From:   Tiffany Rasovic <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 01 Mar 2000 16:36:37 -0500
        Subj:   re. Sandman

[7]     From:   Robert F. O'Connor <
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        Date:   Thursday, 2 Mar 2000 14:58:58 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Franssen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 01 Mar 2000 16:41:12 +0100
Subject: 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

Re Jan Strim's Sandman question: at the Shakespeare and the Twentieth
Century conference (L.A. 96), Alan Levitan of Brandeis University did a
seminar paper on Neil Gaiman's use of Shakespeare in the Sandman
series.  Perhaps a name to start out with.

Paul Franssen
Department of English
Utrecht University
The Netherlands

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Mar 2000 11:09:09 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

One place to start might be with Michael Bristol's article "Shakespeare:
The Myth" in A COMPANION TO SHAKESPEARE, ed. David Scott Kastan
(Blackwell, 1999), 489-502.  In the final pages of the article, he
offers an enthusiastic, brief reading of a number of SANDMAN episodes,
and the article places them within a history of Shakespearean
adaptation.

Cheers,
Douglas Lanier

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[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Deborah Selden <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Mar 2000 10:20:29 -0600
Subject: 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

Amen, Hardy, amen.

>[Editor's Note: There have been past discussion on SHAKSPER regarding
>the Sandman series to which I contributed. They can be located with the
>SEARCH command. I envy your student. The series is a rich trove of
>Shakespearean treasures ready to be mined. I only wish that I had the
>time to do it myself. --Hardy]

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ellen Steiber <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Mar 2000 12:39:42 -0500
Subject: Pop Culture Uses Question
Comment:        SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

Dear Jan:

Your student might want to know that Charlie Vess, the illustrator of
the Sandman's MSND, will answer questions about it on his discussion
board. Charlie's web address is:

                www.greenmanpress.com

And yes, I second Hardy's recommendation.  The Sandman series is a
delight!

All best,
Ellen

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Paul Schnierer <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Mar 2000 18:44:43 +0100 (MET)
Subject: 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

In reply to Jan Strim's query and Hardy's comment:

I couldn't agree more with what Hardy said about the complexity of The
Sandman's Shakespearean (and Marlovian, Miltonic, etc.) allusions. A
paper of mine, discussing The Sandman and other graphic 'novels' as
forms of theatre, might be of interest to you. It is to be published in
the Proceedings of the German Anglistentag 1999, edited by Bernhard
Reitz and due this September from Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier (the
paper's in English).

Cheers,
Peter

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tiffany Rasovic <
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Date:           Wednesday, 01 Mar 2000 16:36:37 -0500
Subject:        re. Sandman

Hi...

I own the Sandman Tempest and I know of another issue that is a
reworking of A Midsummer Night's Dream, (will buy it when I find it).
The main reason I bought these, as well as the excellently illustrated
Workman Othello, Lear and Macbeth, is because of their potential for
getting college students interested in the texts as inspirations in
other art forms than theater and literature.

I think it would be very useful to have the student compare the Sandman
versions with the Shakespeare plays and see which themes have been
embellished/altered/omitted in its adaptation to "comic" form and why.
The Sandman Tempest has a great deal of biographical and historical
allusions which would also be useful for your student to research-the
idea of Shakespeare and Prospero as parallel artists/creators is
foregrounded.  As I said before, I do not know the Midsummer issue.

I fancy that if I get a talented art student in an undergrad Shakespeare
course I might show him/her Sandman and the Workman books and have the
artist render a few scenes from another play as a major class project.
That would be really fun, and who know, might get him or her published!
Well, that's my 2 cents, your student has a good idea and there is the
potential for this to be a "serious" project, not a cop-out at all...

TR

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert F. O'Connor <
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Date:           Thursday, 2 Mar 2000 14:58:58 +1000
Subject: 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0421 Pop Culture Uses Question

A rumination on the Sakespeare and Sandman question - I have recently
read a new collection of short stories and other works by Neil Gaiman,
the creator of the Sandman character and series.  Gaiman turns his hand
to poetry a number of times - with some success, I feel.  It is worth
noting that he certainly has an excellent command and understanding of
some traditional, formal and quite demanding verse forms - the sestina,
the rondel and so on.  Perhaps Shakespeare has had more of an influence
on his work than simply providing apposite quotations.

Rob O'Connor
 

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