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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: Pop Culture: Sandman
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0438  Monday, 6 March 2000.

[1]     From:   John Nettles <
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        Date:   Thursday, 2 Mar 2000 09:11:15 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0431 Re: Pop Culture: Sandman

[2]     From:   Mariann Woodward <
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        Date:   Thursday, 02 Mar 2000 09:43:38 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 11.0431 Re: Pop Culture: Sandman

[3]     From:   Mariann Woodward <
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        Date:   Thursday, 02 Mar 2000 09:56:17 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 11.0431 Re: Pop Culture: Sandman


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Nettles <
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Date:           Thursday, 2 Mar 2000 09:11:15 -0500
Subject: 11.0431 Re: Pop Culture: Sandman
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0431 Re: Pop Culture: Sandman

It's gratifying to find so many Sandman fans around. I'm constantly
having to explain the "Endless" Family poster in my office to people. If
anyone is interested, check out Drew's Script-o-Rama
(www.script-o-rama.com), a clearinghouse of links to screenplays and
teleplays (produced and unproduced) on the Web. It was there that I
discovered the Gaiman-endorsed screenplay to a never-produced Sandman
film. I had no idea that such an animal was even in the works. Haven't
read the screenplay yet, but I'm looking forward to it.

John G. Nettles
Instructor, Dept. of Language and Literature
North Georgia College and State University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mariann Woodward <
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Date:           Thursday, 02 Mar 2000 09:43:38 -0500
Subject: Re: Pop Culture: Sandman
Comment:        SHK 11.0431 Re: Pop Culture: Sandman

Allow me to add my voice to the Gaiman chorus (and envy of further
academic study) - Gaiman is also a talented author of fiction - from
novels such as "Neverwhere" and "Stardust" to short story collections in
"Angels and Visitations" and "Smoke and Mirrors," his charming words
have never ceased to capture my imagination with magic, wonder, and
delight.

Here are some additional Sandman links:

The Annotated Sandman
http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/~wald/sandman-index.html

Additional Annotations
http://home.bip.net/rivieran/annotations.html

Signifying in Comic Books:  Neil Gaiman's The Sandman
http://www.holycow.com/dreaming/academia/thesis.txt

The Aesthetic Advancement and Narrative Fluidity of Neil Gaiman's
Sandman
http://www.holycow.com/dreaming/academia/Anne_Thesis.txt

In Dreams I Walk With You:  Fantasy, Folklore, and Dark Humor in Neil
Gaiman's Sandman Series
http://www.holycow.com/dreaming/academia/Anne_Sandman.txt

All Good Things...
http://www.mndaily.com/ae/Print/ISSUE28/cover.html

There's also a book called the Sandman Companion by Gaiman and Hy
Bender.

Hope this helps!

Mariann T. Woodward
IT Support Specialist, Web Development
Bowie State University || www.bowiestate.edu

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mariann Woodward <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 02 Mar 2000 09:56:17 -0500
Subject: Re: Pop Culture: Sandman
Comment:        SHK 11.0431 Re: Pop Culture: Sandman

Rob O'Connor wrote...
> Perhaps Shakespeare has had more of an influence
> on his work than simply providing apposite quotations.

More than just Shakespeare, it seems.  When Neil Gaiman talks about his
childhood, he describes himself as the "bookie kid."  According to a
biography (http://home.bip.net/rivieran/biography.html), as a child:

   Gaiman was ALWAYS reading, and spent a lot of time at the library.
   He vanished into the worlds of writers such as CS Lewis, and
   started to build up an enormous amount of information on literature.
   This period might not seem so important, but it is the period Gaiman
   himself referred to when people asks him about how he became so
   literate.

Withoug a doubt, Gaiman *is* exceptionally literate and witty, and what
I love most about this excerpt is the emphasis on the long-term value of
reading and books to children, teens, and (of course) adults.
 

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