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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: Taymor Titus
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0464  Wednesday, 8 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Jimmy Jung <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 10:54:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus

[2]     From:   Mark Aune <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 19:39:09 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jimmy Jung <
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Date:           Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 10:54:13 -0500
Subject: 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus

Mike Jensen wrote

>If you want to think
>of these scenes as interpretative footnotes, I disagreed with some of
>her notes, particularly those Jimmy called the nightmare sequences.
>(Note, no one is sleeping, but it is hard to know what else to call
>them.)

Actually I didn't coined the "nightmare" label.  I got it from the Fox
Searchlight site, where you can actually see the sequences in question
(although my download didn't go as smoothly as I hoped).  Look under the
heading "Penny Arcade" and you will also find a short explanation from
Taymor regarding her intent.

http://www.foxsearchlight.com/titus/index.html

jimmy

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Aune <
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Date:           Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 19:39:09 +0000
Subject: 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus

I would just like to echo Mike Jensen's comments on Shakespeare and
film.  Many Shakespeare films do tend to be, for the most part, filmed
dramatic performances.  Others, like Baz Luhrmann's "Romeo and Juliet"
attempt to manipulate the possibilities that the medium of film offers.
I think Richard Longcraine and Ian McKellan's "Richard III" is another
film that takes great advantage of the medium.

[Editor's Note: I thought the Longcraine and McKellan "Richard III" was
better on film that the touring version I saw on stage at the Kennedy
Center Opera House, although the bit with the glove was great. -HMC]
 

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