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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: Modern Dress Query
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0471  Wednesday, 8 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 11:43:18 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0454 Re: Modern Dress Query

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Mar 2000 06:12:41 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 11.0454 Re: Modern Dress Query


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 11:43:18 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 11.0454 Re: Modern Dress Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0454 Re: Modern Dress Query

I just wanted to add that besides the obvious issues of expense and
accessibility, modern dress allows for certain plays on modern dress
conventions.  If Hamlet spends the first four acts in an unbraced Armani
suit, then comes back from the pirate ship in a leather jacket and
jeans, everyone can immediately tell that something has changed.  If
he's wearing an actual doublet, though, the fact that he's supposed to
be sloppy because it's "unbraced" won't click with anyone who doesn't
know how it's supposed to be worn.

Cheers,
Sean.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Wednesday, 8 Mar 2000 06:12:41 -0500
Subject: Re: Modern Dress Query
Comment:        SHK 11.0454 Re: Modern Dress Query

Nicole Imbracsio writes that, in the recent film of Romeo and Juliet,
guns are used in place of swords in order to 'demonstrate the
timelessness of the work'.   Eh?  I'd say it demonstrates exactly the
reverse.

T. Hawkes
 

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