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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0508  Wednesday, 15 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Mar 2000 13:27:36 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night

[2]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Monday, 13 Mar 2000 14:30:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Mar 2000 13:27:36 EST
Subject: 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night

Nigel Hawthorne and Trevor Nunn show us through miraculous subtleties
and niceties how a character can be given flesh by an actor of wide
personal experience and suffering. Malvolio is rightly played as a
Protestant bigot whose religion brings him justification and even an
identity. The adjustment of his wig is a splendid dramatic metaphor, one
that Shakespeare happened not to think of.

Sitting quietly at service's end, "praying" in correct C of E fashion
for nothing other than himself, Hawthorne and Nun paint the very
portrait of hypocrisy.

    Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Monday, 13 Mar 2000 14:30:31 -0500
Subject: 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night

I like the Nunn film very much myself, with some caveats. Because it IS
a film, Imogen Stubbes looks too old for the part ("I do believe she's
thirty,") although I found her convincing (and didn't look pregnant at
all).  I agree that TN is a melancholy play, but it's also an intimate
one-too many scenes were framed with characters who should have been
close together shouting at each other from a distance. (That's one
reason the scene in the kitchen with Feste, Sir Toby, Maria, and Sir
Andrew worked so well-it really was a small scene played small.) I
thought Richard E. Grant was a perfect Sir Andrew. But on my hard drive,
the directory Toby Stephens is filed under is "Useless."

Dana
 

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