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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: Shakespeare and German
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0546  Tuesday, 21 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Jason Hoblit <
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        Date:   Monday< 20 Mar 2000 10:27:20 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

[2]     From:   Jim Lusardi <
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        Date:   Monday< 20 Mar 2000 14:03:08 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

[3]     From:   A. J. Hoenselaars <
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        Date:   Monday< 20 Mar 2000 20:46:23 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

[4]     From:   John Drakakis <
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        Date:   Monday< 20 Mar 2000 19:51:13 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

[5]     From:   Dana Shilling <
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        Date:   Monday< 20 Mar 2000 16:29:04 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

[6]     From:   Douglas Abel <
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        Date:   Monday< 20 Mar 2000 15:47:05 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

[7]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig<
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        Date:   Monday< 20 Mar 2000 19:50:18 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

[8]     From:   Douglas Abel <
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        Date:   Monday< 20 Mar 2000 15:47:05 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

[9]     From:   Lisa Hopkins <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Mar 2000 11:18:04 +0000
        Subj:   German characters


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jason Hoblit <
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Date:           Monday< 20 Mar 2000 10:27:20 -0800
Subject: 11.0530 Shakespeare and German
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

I'm sure thousands will respond with _Faustus_.

Jason Hoblit

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Lusardi <
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Date:           Monday< 20 Mar 2000 14:03:08 -0500
Subject: 11.0530 Shakespeare and German
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

Dear Jack H.:

I don't know whether this is "germane," but Portia does a job on her
German wooer in MV 1.2.82-97.

Jim Lusardi

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           A. J. Hoenselaars <
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Date:           Monday< 20 Mar 2000 20:46:23 +0100
Subject: 11.0530 Shakespeare and German
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

Dear Jack Heller,

If you want to check references to Germany, why not go to Edward H.
Sugden's A TOPOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY TO THE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE AND HIS
FELLOW DRAMATISTS (Manchester: Manchester UP, 1925). A text
unparalleled. You will find a large number of references to the plays
there. Ton Hoenselaars

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <
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Date:           Monday< 20 Mar 2000 19:51:13 -0000
Subject: 11.0530 Shakespeare and German
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

What about the County Palentine in Merchant of Venice?

John Drakakis

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <
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Date:           Monday< 20 Mar 2000 16:29:04 -0500
Subject: 11.0530 Shakespeare and German
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

Close but no cigar..despite the Italian names, M4M notionally takes
place in Vienna, so I suppose theoretically they would be speaking
German.

Dana

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Abel <
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Date:           Monday< 20 Mar 2000 15:47:05 -0700
Subject: 11.0530 Shakespeare and German
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

For Shakespeare's contemporaries, how about Wittenberg, The German
Emperor's Court, and the Duke of Vanholdt's estate in Marlowe's Dr.
Faustus?

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Matthews Craig<
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Date:           Monday< 20 Mar 2000 19:50:18 -0600
Subject: 11.0530 Shakespeare and German
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

This is not a reference to a play or an actor, but does mention "German"
quite specifically:

Posthumus' soliloquy in "Cymbeline" 2.4.167-71 (referring to Iachimo's
supposed seduction of his wife, Imogen):

                                    Perchance he spoke not, but
        Like a full-acorn'd boar, a German one,
        Cried "O!" and mounted; found no opposition
        But what he look'd for should oppose and she
        Should from encounter guard.

Judy Craig

[8]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Abel <
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Date:           Monday< 20 Mar 2000 15:47:05 -0700
Subject: 11.0530 Shakespeare and German
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0530 Shakespeare and German

> A colleague asked me today whether there are any German settings or
> characters in any plays by Shakespeare or his contemporaries. Other than
> the references to Wittenburg in Hamlet, I can't think of major inclusion
> of Germany in the drama. Can you?

As a major character in a Shakespearean play there is only Tamora, the
Queen of Goths, (and all her Goths, "as many as can be") in Titus
Andronicus.

But then there is the question what "Germany" is supposed to mean...  In
Shakespeare's times, the "Holy Roman Empire" included important parts of
Burgundy, the Netherlands (with only one Gent, though), Bohemia, Vienna,
large parts of northern Italy (Milan, Mantua, Parma, Pisa, Genoa) with
the exception of Venice and Verona. To the House of Habsburg you would
also have to count Spain, Sardinia, Sicily and Naples.

In the history plays you might even consider France to have been
originally a Germanic (Salic) country (Charlemagne - Karl der Grosse -
Charles the Great having been a German), but Canterbury in Hen. V.,
I.2.40ff refutes this: "the land Salic is in Germany, / Between the
floods of Sala and of Elbe". He calls it "Meisen". What he then goes on
to say about German women is not particularly nice.

But German men are not particularly nice or attractive, either. The Duke
of Saxony's nephew, a young German suitor to Portia, (Merchant of
Venice, I.2.85) is a great drinker of Rhenish wine - like great eaters
of beef he is no match for a rich lady - he does not even appear on the
stage.  Germans have got some reputation as drinkers and seem to be well
liked by publicans - Bardolph speaks of German devils and Doctor
Faustuses, but the host in the Garter Inn thinks that "Germans are
honest men" (Merry W. IV.V.69).

Otherwise, there is not much to say about Shakespeare's Germany in
today's frontiers. People are (apart from their hats: Merchant 1.2.75)
badly dressed (Much Ado, III.2.35: all slops from the waist down). And
the Blackforest (or Swiss?) watchmaking industry was not yet what it is
today, their clocks being like a woman, never going aright, ever out of
frame (LLL III.1.190ff).

My watch stopped - I will be late - otherwise: look up Marlowe!
arkus Marti

[9]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Mar 2000 11:18:04 +0000
Subject:        German characters

What about the Wittenberg references in Doctor Faustus?

Lisa Hopkins
 

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