2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0575  Monday, 27 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 24 Mar 2000 10:51:46 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0548 Jacobean Dress

[2]     From:   James B. Fitzmaurice <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 24 Mar 2000 11:54:29 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0548 Jacobean Dress


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 24 Mar 2000 10:51:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.0548 Jacobean Dress
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0548 Jacobean Dress

The wonderful website called The Costumer's Manifesto
<http://www.costumes.org/> has a wealth of information about such
details as buttons on the britches. If you don't find a quick answer
there, you can also write the proprietor, who is enormously helpful.

I'm surprised, incidentally, that in another thread no one has mentioned
the mysterious Germans in Merry Wives of Windsor.

Fran Teague http://www.arches.uga.edu/~fteague

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James B. Fitzmaurice <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 24 Mar 2000 11:54:29 -0700
Subject: 11.0548 Jacobean Dress
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0548 Jacobean Dress

The duke of Newcastle makes reference to unbuttoning in order to urinate
in _The Variety_ (performed ca 1640).  The character who delivers these
lines is costumed in Elizabethan dress, much to the amusement of the
other characters on stage.

"Here's a belly peece, that lookes like armour, with what comelinesse
may a man unbutton his doublet, when he seemes to take the wall to make
urine" (Act II, Scene I).

Jim Fitzmaurice

>Someone has suggested to me that Lear's comment Act V Sc3line311 "Pray
>you, undo this button." can be read sexually i.e. that the button
>referred to could be construed as a button fly. I not only find this
>patently absurd in the context but an anachronism as well since I do not
>believe Jacobean costume would have had a button fly. Can anyone shed
>any light on this? Does anyone know if they had button flies in Jacobean
>England?
>
>Ed Kranz
>This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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