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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: ADO Query
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0600  Tuesday, 28 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Michael Friedman <
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        Date:   Monday, 27 Mar 2000 13:47:51 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0580 Re: ADO Query

[2]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Monday, 27 Mar 2000 17:13:12 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0580 Re: ADO Query

[3]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Monday, 27 Mar 2000 19:28:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0580 Re: ADO Query

[4]     From:   Meg Powers Livingston <
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        Date:   Monday, 27 Mar 2000 21:38:58 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0555 Re: ADO Query


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <
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Date:           Monday, 27 Mar 2000 13:47:51 -0500
Subject: 11.0580 Re: ADO Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0580 Re: ADO Query

In response to John Jowett's query, I want to add that I left out of my
paragraph a footnote to Sonnet 3, lines 9-10: "Thou art her glass, and
she in thee / Calls back the lovely April of her prime."  In this case,
it's the young man's mother whose image is "repainted" rather than a
man's.

Michael D. Friedman
University of Scranton

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Monday, 27 Mar 2000 17:13:12 -0500
Subject: 11.0580 Re: ADO Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0580 Re: ADO Query

Clifford Stetner feels that Benedick's resolve to go get Beatrice's
picture must be "clarified with props".  I confess myself baffled by
this; the literal understanding of the line is surely within the reach
of C20 spectators even if they do not know about the tradition of
miniature paintings I referred to in an earlier post.  Does Mr. Stetner
have no friends or relations who carry photos of their loved ones in
their wallets?

I would also like to take exception to his smug insistence on "the
superiority of the poet's art over the painter's, as there is little
room in a miniature for more than one meaning at a time." Whether the
visual arts afford exact analogues to verbal irony is a nice and very
complex question.  But as I have argued in Literature and the Visual
Arts in Tudor England (280 ff.), pictures, statues, even architecture
can certainly convey more than one meaning at a time; and whether by the
inclusion of symbolic items, or more subtly by the exaggeration or
suppression of formal and gestural conventions within the framing
tradition of early modern portraiture, even something as small as a
miniature might inscribe for a sophisticated viewer a complex set of
significations.  In any case the remark comes oddly in connection with
work written for the theater; it appears to privilege radio over the
stage, and silent reading over both.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Monday, 27 Mar 2000 19:28:13 -0500
Subject: 11.0580 Re: ADO Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0580 Re: ADO Query

I don't see what the problem is. There are multiple possible meanings.
But Shakespeare isn't a multiple choice test. Unless one of the answers
is "All of the above."

Shakespeare constructs his language multidimensionally by having the
multiple meanings of the words he chooses extend outward from all their
possible directions. His synaptic connections must have been
astonishing.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Meg Powers Livingston <
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Date:           Monday, 27 Mar 2000 21:38:58 -0800
Subject: 11.0555 Re: ADO Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0555 Re: ADO Query

>I would be interested to know
>whether there are other examples in the period of it being the woman's
>image rather than the man's that is said to be painted or printed when a
>child is 'got'.

See Shakespeare's Sonnet 3, "Thou art thy mother's glass, and she in
thee / Calls back the lovely April of her prime"

Cheers,
Meg
 

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