Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: Early Modern Skin Disfigurements
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0646  Friday, 31 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 12:26:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements

[2]     From:   Peter Hyland <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 12:53:25 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements

[3]     From:   Geralyn Horton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 15:16:43 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements

[4]     From:   Paul Franssen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 31 Mar 2000 12:41:58 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 12:26:40 -0500
Subject: 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements

I am not familiar with any internally ingested toxic agent that produces
scabs or encrustation.  But Shakespeare was elsewhere quite accurate in
describing dermatological diseases.  Bardolph quite clearly suffers from
Rhinophyma.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Hyland <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 12:53:25 -0800
Subject: 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements

In reponse to Frank Whigham's query about poisons that destroy
outwardly, it does appear that at least Webster believed that some
poisons work this way. The poison sprinkled in Brachiano's helmet in THE
WHITE DEVIL does.

How do nicotine patches work?

Peter Hyland

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 15:16:43 -0500
Subject: 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements

>Did a skin-ravaging agent
>just get called a "poison" in the normal run of speech?

This is still so termed, isn't it?  Poison Ivy, poison Oak, sun
poisoning?  All of which form seeping blisters followed by scabs?

Geralyn Horton, Playwright
Newton, Mass. 02460
<http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Franssen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 31 Mar 2000 12:41:58 +0200
Subject: 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0631 Early Modern Skin Disfigurements

Re Frank Whigham's remarks on poison being applied outwardly: the
classical example, it seems to me, would be Hercules killed by wearing
Nessus' shirt, which is soaked with the poisonous blood of the Lernaean
hydra. The story, recounted by Ovid in his Metamorphoses book 9, was
obviously known to Shakespeare, as he makes Anthony refer to his
torments as "the shirt of Nessus" (A & C, 4.12)

Paul Franssen
English Department
University of Utrecht
The Netherlands
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.