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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: March ::
Re: ADO Query
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0645  Friday, 31 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Melissa D. Aaron <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 08:46:09 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0627 Re: ADO Query

[2]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 11:35:06 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0614 Re: ADO Query


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa D. Aaron <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 08:46:09 -0800
Subject: 11.0627 Re: ADO Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0627 Re: ADO Query

>Another possibility is that Benedick must "get" Beatrice's picture by
>drawing it himself (cf. Helena & Bertram). I tend to think of drawing as
>more a ladylike accomplishment than a soldierly one, but early modern
>people had to be able to generate their own amusements.

Interesting idea, but I find it hard to believe that the Benedick who
can't write verse can limn pictures.  I think it's must more credible
that he gets a miniaturist to make a copy of some already-existing
painting in Leonato's house.

Melissa D. Aaron

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Mar 2000 11:35:06 -0800
Subject: 11.0614 Re: ADO Query
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0614 Re: ADO Query

Clifford Stetner writes:

> I make no claim for the one or the other, but in your
> research you certainly discovered that the debate was popular in the
> Renaissance among poets and painters alike.  Vision standing highest on
> the Platonic ladder of the senses, visual artists claimed supereminence,
> while defenders of poetry like Sidney claimed virtually divine status
> for their art.

Do you, Cliff, or anyone else know of a concise summary of this debate,
or its major texts?  I realize that it's something of a commonplace for
artists to lionize their art, but is there a particular works that
summarizes the major lines of argument, perhaps treating this question
as a consistent debate?

Cheers,
Se

 

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