2000

_Othello_ cited in _Topsy Turvy_

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0533  Monday, 20 March 2000.

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 16 Mar 2000 21:23:06 -0500
Subject:        _Othello_ cited in _Topsy Turvy_

"What a full fortune does the thick lips owe" is quoted by an actor from
the Savoy theater in Mike Leigh's film about Gilbert and Sullivan,
_Topsy Turvy_.  The actor is lunching with two other actors and cites
Roderigo's line from 1.1 in a racist discussion about General Gordon'
defeat and death at Khartoum by "ungentlemanly" Arabs.  One of the
actors does not recognize the line, and the actor who cited it is
surprised at the other's ignorance.  The source of the line is not
identified in the film.

Cross-Cultural Casting

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0532  Monday, 20 March 2000.

From:           Werner Habicht <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Mar 2000 02:09:48 +0100
Subject: 11.0512 Cross-Cultural Casting
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0512 Cross-Cultural Casting

Probably the most obvious case of cross-cultural casting was Peter
Brook's French  Tempest of 1990. The script published by the Centre
International de Creations Theatrales contains numerous scene
photographs (in colour). In Karin Beier's production of A Midsummer
Night's Dream (1995) the casting was merely pan-European, but the actors
all spoke in their ten or so different native languages (see Wilhelm
Hortmann's Shakespeare on the German Stage (CUP 1998), p.473-475).

Shakespeare and German

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0530  Monday, 20 March 2000.

From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 16 Mar 2000 17:08:08 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare and German

Dear SHAKSPEReans:

A colleague asked me today whether there are any German settings or
characters in any plays by Shakespeare or his contemporaries. Other than
the references to Wittenburg in Hamlet, I can't think of major inclusion
of Germany in the drama. Can you?

Jack Heller

Measure for Measure in Melbourne

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0531  Monday, 20 March 2000.

From:           Tim Richards <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 17 Mar 2000 09:54:59 +1100
Subject:        Measure for Measure in Melbourne

I've just reviewed the Melbourne Theatre Company's new production of
Measure for Measure for my theatre site Stage Left. It was the first
time I've seen the play performed and it was an interesting experience.
Shakespeare must have been in a cynical frame of mind when he wrote
this...  I thought the text had a lot to say about the foolishness of
enforcing laws that human nature will drive people to break anyway (read
into this a consideration of Prohibition, drug and prostitution laws).

The MTC's set is visually striking, they've gone for a heaven above/hell
below approach. The main stage is a large disc, reminiscent of a manhole
cover, with stairs spiraling down to cells and spiraling up into a
cloud-like structure of white cloth. A large sewer pipe empties from
upstage left into a channel that bisects the disc. Through the channel
flows various fluids that add to the grime and corruption of the city.
Isabella's pure-white dress by the end is badly stained above the hem.

I find the character of the Duke fascinating: how are we meant to take
him?  If you analyse his actions in an objective way, he seems both
cowardly and manipulating in abandoning his responsibilities but playing
with people's fates and affections to his own benefit.

Anyway, if you're interested in my full review of the production, you
can read it at http://www.stageleft.com.au.

Tim Richards.

Ophelia / O-phallos

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0529  Monday, 20 March 2000.

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 16 Mar 2000 16:49:11 -0500
Subject:        Ophelia / O-phallos

In his essay on Hamlet, Jacques Lacan puns on Ophelia's name (as
O-phallus) only to dismiss the pun. Any one happen to know anything
about her name, which I assume was rather rare in Shakespeare's day?

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