2000

Adobe Download of Poems

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0513  Wednesday, 15 March 2000.

From:           Jimmy Jung <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Mar 2000 16:18:34 -0500
Subject:        Adobe Download of Poems

Adobe is allowing the download of some excerpts from Octavo's
Shakespeare's Poems.  It is about eight pages, including the cover and
frontispiece.

http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/webbuy/freebooks.html

Cross-Cultural and Colour-Blind Casting

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0512  Wednesday, 15 March 2000.

From:           Greg Bak <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Mar 2000 16:35:03 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Cross-Cultural and Colour-Blind Casting

Hello

I am currently conducting research on cross-cultural and colour-blind
casting, with particular reference to Othello. I have been able to
locate reviews and interviews relating to Patrick Stewart's Othello in
Washington in 1997, but am having difficulty finding articles analyzing
cross-cultural and colour-blind casting as general concepts.

I would appreciate it if anyone could recommend such articles, whether
they deal with Othello or not.

Please reply off-list. My email address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Thanks!

Greg Bak

Re: Time Square MM

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0509  Wednesday, 15 March 2000.

From:           Jes


Promotion of Pornography

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0510  Wednesday, 15 March 2000.

From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, March 13, 2000 19:08:28 -0000
Subject:        Promotion of Pornography

I propose that Richard Burt's misuse of SHAKSPER for the promotion of
commercial pornographic events be stopped.

SHAKSPER isn't a democracy-Hardy's judgement as editor / owner/
moderator is final-but if the majority feel that something is antisocial
I'm sure Hardy would respond. If Burt's postings are acceptable to the
listmembers I can simply unsubscribe to avoid them, but I'd like to be
sure Burt's not simply exploiting our collective apathy.

I should say, it's not that I simply don't want to read Burt postings
(the DELETE key would deal with that) but rather that I don't want to be
part of an intellectual community in which the degradation of women is
promoted as entertainment. (It's bad enough outside of academia, I had
hoped that inside was more enlightened.)

Gabriel Egan

[Editor's Note: The issue, it appears to me, is a judgment about what is
the promotion of commercial pornography and therefore explotation and
degradation of women and what is citation of Shakespeare in popular
culture. I ask does the citation of a cultural reference in an academic
forum constitute promotion even if that citation be exploitive, racist,
anti-Semitic, or in other ways unacceptable to some or many for one
reason or another. Should I reject a posting about a pro-Nazi, Arian
Nation production of Julius Caesar because I am anti-fascist? Should I
not post a reference to a racist version of Romeo and Juliet (they die
because people of different races should not date without their parents'
permission, especially in small religious college in the South)? I could
go on and on. Gabriel Egan believes that Richard Burt is promoting
commercial pornography. I am not convinced. Although I am considerably
busy, I will entertain private e-mail on the subject if it is marked
private and sent to me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. By way of apology, I
currently happen to be suffering a great deal of anguish because I do
not have enough time for writing the essays and reviews I have been
commissioned to write and editing my edition of Shakespeare's POEMS for
the Internet Shakespeare Editions, even though I expect to have four to
six publications this year. The major reason for my predicament is that
I am a chair of a department in an institution in which research is not
a priority and in which other factors sometimes get me down. This
anguish is one of the reasons of late that I have not been as regular
about the delivery of SHAKSPER digests as I usually am. For this I am
sorry, but I also am human. -Hardy]

Re: Nunn's Twelfth Night

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0508  Wednesday, 15 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Mar 2000 13:27:36 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night

[2]     From:   Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Mar 2000 14:30:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Mar 2000 13:27:36 EST
Subject: 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night

Nigel Hawthorne and Trevor Nunn show us through miraculous subtleties
and niceties how a character can be given flesh by an actor of wide
personal experience and suffering. Malvolio is rightly played as a
Protestant bigot whose religion brings him justification and even an
identity. The adjustment of his wig is a splendid dramatic metaphor, one
that Shakespeare happened not to think of.

Sitting quietly at service's end, "praying" in correct C of E fashion
for nothing other than himself, Hawthorne and Nun paint the very
portrait of hypocrisy.

    Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Shilling <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Mar 2000 14:30:31 -0500
Subject: 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0494 Nunn's Twelfth Night

I like the Nunn film very much myself, with some caveats. Because it IS
a film, Imogen Stubbes looks too old for the part ("I do believe she's
thirty,") although I found her convincing (and didn't look pregnant at
all).  I agree that TN is a melancholy play, but it's also an intimate
one-too many scenes were framed with characters who should have been
close together shouting at each other from a distance. (That's one
reason the scene in the kitchen with Feste, Sir Toby, Maria, and Sir
Andrew worked so well-it really was a small scene played small.) I
thought Richard E. Grant was a perfect Sir Andrew. But on my hard drive,
the directory Toby Stephens is filed under is "Useless."

Dana

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.