2000

Re: Email Tutoring Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0468  Wednesday, 8 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Stacy Mulder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 12:46:43 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0461 Email Tutoring Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Skip Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 22:20:54 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0461 Email Tutoring Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stacy Mulder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 12:46:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.0461 Email Tutoring Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0461 Email Tutoring Shakespeare

For Brian South:

What a delight to tutor one so young--though gifted--on one of the
Bard's best!

One practice I find enlightening is to have my students do a cross-media
study of MND-even more fun now with additional film versions easily
available.  Depending on just how eager and advanced your student is,
you might give her a small dose of critical theory (Formalism, Feminist,
Freud and Jung) and let her have at the play-both written and film
versions-with those critical ideas in mind. I think she would enjoy
seeing how different critical theories come to the surface with varying
representations of the play. Using theory helps avoid the common trap of
film versions: "Let's compare what is in the written play that is
omitted in the film," etc.

And by all means let her read aloud. If you have access to any helpers
at all, an impromptu dramatization of all or part of the rude
mechanicals' presentation to the wedding party is great fun and adds so
much to understanding some of the issues in the drama. Minimalist props
and costuming (a sandwich board made into "Wall") will give your tutee
some "backstage" experience, too.

Stacy Mulder
Ball State University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Nicholson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 22:20:54 -0800
Subject: 11.0461 Email Tutoring Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0461 Email Tutoring Shakespeare

Try the Cambridge School Shakespeare edition of the play. It's got
hundreds of activities-many for small groups, but many that an
individual could do as well.

Cheers,
Skip Nicholson
South Pasadena (CA) HS
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Julius Caesar, Cesario, Ganymede

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0467  Wednesday, 8 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 12:32:56 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar, Cesario, Ganymede

[2]     From:   L. Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 11:55:40 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar

[3]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 14:44:29 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 12:32:56 -0500
Subject: 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar, Cesario, Ganymede
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar, Cesario, Ganymede

Since posting the query about Cesario, I had a chance to poke into
Stephen Orgel's Impersonations (Cambridge UP, 1997), which speculates
exactly on my point about the possible sexual ambiguity of the name
Cesario.  Orgel cleverly points to the root of "Caesar" in the past
participle of caedere, caesus, "cut," and points to Cesario's identity
as a singing eunuch and to the various puns on "cut" and a possible
"cunt" in the play (pp. 53-55).

Orgel also mentions that "Cesario" is the Italian equivalent of
"Caesarius" in Latin, "someone belonging to Caesar," which could make
Cesario into a boy-toy for Caesar; but he does not push that point.

I still wonder a little about the sexual ambiguity of Julius Caesar
himself, even though Shakespeare does not seem to make Caesar
ambisextrous in his own play on the subject.  And I still worry about
Caesarian sections and unnatural births.

Thanks to Ed Taft for bringing up the potential connection between
Julius Caesar and Jesus Christ.  I am also still worrying about actors'
in-jokes about who played Julius Caesar (I can't see how the actor who
played a dotard Polonius might easily fit the role of Julius Caesar).

Roy Flannagan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           L. Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 11:55:40 -0600
Subject: 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar

If Ed Taft or anyone else wants to know anything about Shakespeare's
character, Julius Caesar, he should look only at the play and ignore
history - and be chary of making associations with Christ or anyone
else.  The character of Caesar is best seen by our shaking loose from
all historical references by renaming the characters Billy Joe and Jim
Bob, or Cedric and Osgood. Let the play define the character.   If we
let history intrude, we tend to expand the text beyond the immediate
intentions of the play; in short, we miss Shakespeare's point about this
person.

L. Swilley

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 14:44:29 -0600
Subject: 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0455 Re: Julius Caesar

Ed Taft writes:

<Roy, I don't know what the "Caesar joke" is, but I wonder
<if the focus is on the initials JC?

I don't know what the joke is either, but my initials are "JC" (Judy
Craig).  I keep myself from megalomaniac tendencies by remembering that
JC Penney has them, too.

Judy Craig

Re: Portrayals of Shylocks

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0465  Wednesday, 8 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Bill Gelber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 10:58:43 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

[2]     From:   Mark Lawhorn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 06:31:01 -1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

[3]     From:   Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 09:11:24 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

[4]     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 12:36:38 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

[5]     From:   Pete Wilson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 09:43:05 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

[6]     From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 23:37:57 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Gelber <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 10:58:43 EST
Subject: 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

One of the most interesting to me is the "Dueling Shylocks" on "Playing
Shakespeare" by John Barton. If you can acquire this videotape, Patrick
Stewart and David Suchet square off with their interpretations and each
perform the major speeches. (Olivier's Victorian Shylock is available on
tape, as is the BBC Shylock which is Renaissance, a terrific actor whose
name suddenly escapes me.) Which reminds me, does anyone have the
documentary that the Southbank Show made about Sir Peter Hall directing
Dustin Hoffman as Shylock? I would love to see it.

Sincerely,
Bill Gelber

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Lawhorn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 06:31:01 -1000
Subject: 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

For videotaped portrayals of Shylock, I would suggest the "Exploring a
Character" video in John Barton's "Playing Shakspeare" series.  Patrick
Stewart and David Suchet offer their contrasting interpretations of the
role.  My students have enjoyed this one.  Mark

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 09:11:24 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

To Ken Adelman:

The videocassette, "Exploring a Character," in John Barton's series of
videocassettes, Playing Shakespeare, features Barton working with
Patrick Stewart and David Suchet on different representations of
Shylock.  It's also ch. 10 of Barton's book of the same title.  Many
university and public libraries have the whole series.  Hope this is of
some help.

Evelyn Gajowski

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 12:36:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

There's the "duelling Shylocks" in John Barton's set of videos on
performing Shakespeare:  Patrick Stewart and David Suchet each perform
different readings or versions of Shylock.  You could toss in the
Olivier Shylock as a further choice that offers more depth than the BBC
Shylock.  I don't know about "grubby and dirty, or proper and majestic"
as appropriate performance choices however.  Stewart's Shylock is cold
and business-like; Suchet's is sensitive and self-defensive; Olivier's
is proudly assimilationist within clearly defined limits, and the BBC
Shylock is narrowly tribal.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pete Wilson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 09:43:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

Ken Adelman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> wrote:

>Does anyone have film clips, videos, or even photos showing different
>types of depictions of Shylock?  I am interested in showing my class
>how
>the same character-this character, Shylock-may be presented as grubby
>and dirty, or proper and majestic, and I know that Shylock had been
>portrayed on stage in these ways, and more.
>
>How can I best show that, rather than merely orally describe it?

What a good idea! But doesn't this present a golden opportunity for the
students themselves to play and to show these many different Shylocks?

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 23:37:57 -0000
Subject: 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.0451 Portrayals of Shylocks

Dear Ken Adelman,

You will find photographs of performances (sets, actors etc.) in the
Shakespeare Centre in Henley Street in Stratford-upon-Avon.  They keep a
record of RSC performances and reviews.  In addition the RSC shop also
has packs of postcards detailing performances.  For example, I recently
bought a postcard of Philip Voss as Shylock in the 1998 RSC production.
Also the Jonathan Miller/ Olivier production of 1970 is currently
available on video, certainly in the UK, and, I imagine in the USA also.

If you are looking for a variety of Shylocks then you might want to look
at the Antony Sher Shylock (1996?), the Patrick Stewart Shylock (1978),
the Olivier Shylock (1970), and the Voss Shylock (1998).  Sher is
probably the most 'ethnic' and Olivier the most urbane.  There is a
Peter Zadek production of 1993 that shows Shylock as being no different
in appearance from the Christians.  There is also a Deutschestheater
production of 1986 that has Shylock at one point dressed in
concentration camp garb.  I don't recall offhand the actor who played
Shylock in that production, but it was particularly memorable for its
Georg Grosz-like depiction of Venice.

You might also look at the various ways in which Launcelet Gobbo is
depicted, and also Jessica.

I hope this is of some help to you.

Cheers,
John Drakakis

Shakespeare Marathon

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0466  Wednesday, 8 March 2000.

From:           Carl Fortunato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Mar 2000 11:46:57 EST
Subject:        Shakespeare Marathon

For those who don't know, Applause Books in New York City (73rd and
Broadway) is holding a Shakespeare Marathon where they will have actors
reading all 36 plays in the First Folio from new First Folio editions.
Yours truly has been asked to read the role of Suffolk in Henry VI Part
1 and 2.

The schedule for the Marathon is as follows:

Monday March 13th
3pm Henry VI Part 1
6pm Comedie of Errors
9pm Titus Andronicus

Tuesday March 14th
3pm Two Gentlemen of Verona
6pm  Henry VI Part 2
9pm Romeo and Juliet

Wednesday March 15th
3pm  Henry VI Part 3
6pm Taming of the Shrew
9pm Julius Caesar

Thursday March 16th
3pm Loves Labors Lost
6pm Timon of Athens
9pm Richard III

Friday March 17th
3pm King John
6pm As You Like It
9pm Richard II

Saturday March 18th
3pm The Merchant of Venice
6pm Henry IV Part 1
9pm Hamlet

Sunday March 19th
3pm A Midsommer Night's Dreame
6pm Henry IV Part 2
9pm Troilus and Cressida

Monday March 20th
3pm Henry V
6pm Measure for Measure
9pm The Tragedie of Cymbeline

Tuesday March 21st
3pm Much Ado about Nothing
6pm Merry Wives of Windsor
9pm King Lear

Wednesday March 22nd
3pm Alls Well that Ends Well
6pm 12th Night
9pm Othello

Thursday March 23rd
3pm Coriolanus
6pm Winter's Tale
9pm Antony and Cleopatra

Friday March 24th
3pm Henry VIIIth
6pm Macbeth
9pm The Tempest

Re: Taymor Titus

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0464  Wednesday, 8 March 2000.

[1]     From:   Jimmy Jung <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 10:54:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus

[2]     From:   Mark Aune <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 19:39:09 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jimmy Jung <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 10:54:13 -0500
Subject: 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus

Mike Jensen wrote

>If you want to think
>of these scenes as interpretative footnotes, I disagreed with some of
>her notes, particularly those Jimmy called the nightmare sequences.
>(Note, no one is sleeping, but it is hard to know what else to call
>them.)

Actually I didn't coined the "nightmare" label.  I got it from the Fox
Searchlight site, where you can actually see the sequences in question
(although my download didn't go as smoothly as I hoped).  Look under the
heading "Penny Arcade" and you will also find a short explanation from
Taymor regarding her intent.

http://www.foxsearchlight.com/titus/index.html

jimmy

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Aune <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 07 Mar 2000 19:39:09 +0000
Subject: 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0450 Re: Taymor Titus

I would just like to echo Mike Jensen's comments on Shakespeare and
film.  Many Shakespeare films do tend to be, for the most part, filmed
dramatic performances.  Others, like Baz Luhrmann's "Romeo and Juliet"
attempt to manipulate the possibilities that the medium of film offers.
I think Richard Longcraine and Ian McKellan's "Richard III" is another
film that takes great advantage of the medium.

[Editor's Note: I thought the Longcraine and McKellan "Richard III" was
better on film that the touring version I saw on stage at the Kennedy
Center Opera House, although the bit with the glove was great. -HMC]

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