2000

King of Shadows and Shakespeare Meets Victoria

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0448  Monday, 6 March 2000.

From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 5 Mar 2000 13:51:44 -0600
Subject:        King of Shadows and Shakespeare Meets Victoria

I recently finished Susan Cooper's King of Shadows, recommended by
someone on this list, and recommend it wholeheartedly to others. While
written for a young adult audience, I found it both fascinating and
ultimately very moving in its treatment of young people, theater, and
Shakespeare. I would also encourage you to recommend it to others with
such interests, especially young people. In another area, Shakespeare
meets popular culture this month in the current (March) issue of
Victoria magazine (the issue title is "In Love with Shakespeare's
England"), which includes a profile of Folger librarian Georgianna
Ziegler, as well as wonderful quotations, beautiful photographs, and
promising recipes.

Chris Gordon

Modern Dress Query

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0447  Monday, 6 March 2000.

From:           Alice Jane Cooley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 5 Mar 2000 13:44:54 -0500
Subject:        Modern Dress Query

I have a query for any members of this list who have directed
productions of Shakespeare or other Renaissance plays, and chose to
place them in modern settings. The question, in a word, is: Why?

I should explain the context. I am working on a project on the use of
anachronism in several medieval and Renaissance texts, and as an
introduction to my paper I want to discuss the possible reasons for
using anachronism other than the straightforward, "They didn't know any
better" excuse. I'm trying to do a little primary research on the
subject. Obviously, the use of modern dress in Shakespearean productions
is one modern example of anachronism used for artistic effect, and one
which modern audiences seem to accept quite readily. I am less
interested in theoretical statements about the significance of this kind
of choice than in hearing directly from those who have made the choice,
why they made it. I would be greatly appreciative of any answers that
people have.

Thanks,
Alice Cooley

P.S. If my project strikes some as jejune or unoriginal, I must plead
that I am a mere undergraduate, working on a senior essay. Humour me...

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0445  Monday, 6 March 2000.

From:           Terri Mategrano <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 3 Mar 2000 12:39:23 EST
Subject:        Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 42nd Annual M/MLA Convention to be held November 2-4, 2000 in Kansas
City, MO.

Science Fiction panel, Futuristic Elizabethans: Shakespeare in Star Trek

This session is seeking papers exploring the use of Shakespearean
motifs, character types, and language in Star Trek episodes, movies, and
books.

Please submit proposals by April 5, 2000.

Terri Mategrano
English
Northern Illinois University
Dekalb, IL 601115
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Job at the Perseus Project at Tufts University

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0446  Monday, 6 March 2000.

From:           Gregory Crane <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 3 Mar 2000 12:55:03 -0500
Subject:        Job at the Perseus Project at Tufts University

Here is a job posting (as listed on the MLA job web site).

JOB AT THE PERSEUS PROJECT AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY

  Post-doctoral Fellow

The Perseus Digital Library Project at Tufts University is seeking a
full-time Post-doctoral Fellow with a strong background in either early
modern English or eighteenth and nineteenth-century London. The
successful candidate will participate in a multi-disciplinary research
project exploring innovative ways of structuring traditional source
materials for electronic publication. Strong technical skills are
required: a working knowledge of UNIX/LINUX is preferred, but applicant
should be familiar with multiple operating systems; programming skills
are preferred, but the applicant must be willing to learn these skills
on the job. The researcher must be committed to using technology to
bridge the gap between teaching and research and to exploiting media
such as the Web to reach beyond academia. Duties will include
structuring data, developing curricula for NEH-sponsored teacher
workshops, and presenting the results of such work in papers and
presentations. Position begins July 1, 2000 and continues for two years.
This position is full-time and includes benefits. Tufts is an equal
opportunity employer. Please send cover letter and 2 page CV with three
references to: Lisa M. Cerrato Managing Editor Perseus Project Tufts
University Eaton Hall 124 Medford, MA 02155

PLEASE REPOST AS APPROPRIATE

Gregory Crane
Professor of Classics
Winnick Family Chair in Technology and Entrepreneurship
Editor-in-Chief, Perseus Project
Eaton 124
Tufts University
Medford MA 02155

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/About/grc.html

Re: CSF Shrew

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0444  Monday, 6 March 2000.

From:           John Savage <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 3 Mar 2000 08:40:08 -0500
Subject: Re: CSF Shrew
Comment:        SHK 11.0416 Re: CSF Shrew

>I would love to see a performance of Taming of the Shrew in Wild West
>digs. The Globe of the Great Southwest needs it!! <<  Judy Craig

All right, but without the "Howdys" and "You-Alls."  <g>

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