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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: April ::
Re: The Button
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0687  Tuesday, 4 April 2000.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Monday, 03 Apr 2000 09:15:48 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Button

[2]     From:   Nicolas Pullin <
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        Date:   Monday, 03 Apr 2000 11:16:22 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 11.0657 Re: The Button


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <
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Date:           Monday, 03 Apr 2000 09:15:48 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Button

I think that we need to recognize that there is an awful doubleness
about Lear's final lines: 1) When men are hanged, they often ejaculate;
2) Lear laments that Cordelia will "come no more"; 3) the botton can
refer to two places that can be unbuttoned on the male anatomy; 4) women
have two pairs of lips, not one pair; and

        "Look on her, look, her lips,
        Look there, look there." (KL 5.3.316-17)

Try as he might, Lear is never able to break free of the incestuous love
he bears for Cordelia. It taints and defines him to the very end.  THIS
is the tragedy of King Lear.

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicolas Pullin <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 03 Apr 2000 11:16:22 -0500
Subject: Re: The Button
Comment:        SHK 11.0657 Re: The Button

Re: doubling Laertes.

Or possibly the player king or or player/Lucianus.  If the First Player
is not played as an old man, then the doubling works with plenty of time
for costume changes.  However, if typological signifiers are threaded
through the play's staging, both the player king in his "acting" of the
Pyrrhus narrative and Lucianus, "nephew to the king" and murderer
(though not revenger), both offer Hamlet and the audience useful
parallels, just as Laertes does.
 

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