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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: April ::
Apocryphal Works & Holographic Research
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0690  Tuesday, 4 April 2000.

[1]     From:   John Ciccarelli <
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        Date:   Monday, 3 Apr 2000 12:17:45 -0400
        Subj:   Apocryphal Works

[2]     From:   John Ciccarelli <
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        Date:   Monday, 3 Apr 2000 12:44:06 -0400
        Subj:   Holographic Research


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ciccarelli <
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Date:           Monday, 3 Apr 2000 12:17:45 -0400
Subject:        Apocryphal Works

With all the recent messages about "The Two Noble Kinsman", I am curious
to know if any of the other apocryphal works are being considered for
addition to the Canon and what is the current scholarly view of them.
It wasn't that long ago that 'Kinsman' was considered in league with
these other plays, but the tide shifted in it's favor.  Several months
ago I read an on-line article (can't recall where) that "Edward III" was
being added to new printings of some complete works editions in Jan
2000.  Is this the case or is this play still under contention?  Another
possible candidate that I have read about is Sir Thomas More with Hand D
is being considered Shakespeare's.  Also several years ago Eric Sams
wrote books presenting interesting cases for both"Edward III" and
"Edmund Ironside".  Are any of these plays under consideration?

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Ciccarelli <
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Date:           Monday, 3 Apr 2000 12:44:06 -0400
Subject:        Holographic Research

This is an addition to my posting on apocryphal plays.  I read Charles
Hamilton's work on the ascribed Middleton play "The Second Maiden's
Tragedy".  In it he presents an interesting, but not conclusive case for
the play being the lost Shakespeare/Fletcher collaboration of
"Cardenio".  One of the more compelling arguments and his area of
expertise was in the holography of the manuscript.  Hamilton argues that
by using Shakespear'e will, which he insists was written by him, that we
can discover other samples of his writing.  The crux of his thesis being
that the 'Second Maiden's' manuscript and Shakespear'e will were written
in the same hand as well as that of Hand D in Sir Thomas More.  Other
than Hamilton's book, I have not seen any commentary on the subject of
using the will to match handwriting samples.

Has there been any attempt to either confirm or refute his findings
based on the handwriting between these documents?  There is a school of
thought that Shakespeare did not actually right the will himself, but
was taken down by a clerk, therefore Hamilton's arguement is void
because his source material is suspect.  If this is the case, however,
why is third page of the will almost illegible, as if written by an
unsteady hand, and why does the will include the phrase "by me",
indicating it was written by Shakespeare?  Given these two discrepancies
isn't there sufficient cause to consider doing extensive holograhic
analysis on the documents?  Even if the findings were inconclusive, it
would be an interesting new line of research.

Is any research into this area taking place?  If not, why isn't there?
 

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