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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: April ::
Re: Some Thoughts
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0734  Monday, 10 April 2000.

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 05 Apr 2000 09:00:23 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0689 Some Thoughts

[2]     From:   Norman J. Myers <
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        Date:   Thursday, 6 Apr 2000 14:04:13 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0718 Re: Some Thoughts (a quick further note)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 05 Apr 2000 09:00:23 -0700
Subject: 11.0689 Some Thoughts
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0689 Some Thoughts

Norman Myers writes:

> I've been reading a provocative book by Peter J. Gomes, preacher to
> Harvard University, called "The Good Book".  It's obviously about
> Biblical interpretation, but I suspect, without meaning to give offense
> to anyone, if we substituted "Shakespeare" for "scripture", some of what
> Gomes has to say might be appropriate to any discussion about any topic
> on the list.

I think that it is very interesting, though it's not really very
surprising.  A lot of critical and theoretical questions and debates
have been anticipated in theology, with its much longer and sometimes
more serious tradition of examining texts.  To choose a simple example,
it was Friedrich Schleiermacher, before even the "old" historicists, who
pointed to the importance of understanding the culture out of which
texts were produced, and in fact, made this sort of historical
relativism the basis of his 'hermeneutic', a term he coined.  He was
contested by Albert Schweitzer, Karl Barth and Rudolf Bultmann, among
others, who all extended this basic historicist notion until it broke
down, or, in Barth's case, rejected it altogether on the grounds that it
doesn't provide a position outside of history from which history is
judged.  All of which should be eerily familiar to us.

And in fact, a lot of theorists continue to draw on theology for basic
elements of their ideas.  Ren

 

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