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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: April ::
Re: The Sonnets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0794  Friday, 14 April 2000.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Apr 2000 08:17:40 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Sonnet 20

[2]     From:   Marilyn Bonomi <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Apr 2000 09:46:10 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0780 Re: Sonnet 20

[3]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Apr 2000 16:51:41 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0780 Re: Sonnet 20


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Apr 2000 08:17:40 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Sonnet 20

Sean Lawrence's response to Douglas Chapman's post is defensive and
uncharitable. Chapman says some things that scholars don't want to hear,
but he is nonetheless all too often right.  By the way, Eric Hoffer knew
Socrates very well and often thought of him-self as a modern-day
Socrates.  Both Hoffer and Socrates sought to jolt others into new ways
of thinking, often by asking awkward questions that made others
reexamine their premises and their conclusions.

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn Bonomi <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Apr 2000 09:46:10 -0400
Subject: 11.0780 Re: Sonnet 20
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0780 Re: Sonnet 20

A brief query regarding the SEQUENCE of the sonnets:  Do we know w/ any
certainty that the order is Shakespeare's own arrangement rather than
the decisions of an editor after the fact?

Marilyn Bonomi

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Matthews Craig <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Apr 2000 16:51:41 -0500
Subject: 11.0780 Re: Sonnet 20
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0780 Re: Sonnet 20

I agree, Robin, that Sonnet 18 could be read as addressed to a woman,
but in the context of the "poems addressed to the young man, advising
him to marry" which has been the traditional reading of the beginning
sonnets (1-126), Sonnet 18 fits the model that I outlined in earlier
emails-that the speaker of the sonnet is praising the youth for his
beauty which in the context of highly competitive court life would be a
"safe" thing to do.  The speaker of Sonnets 18 and 19 is giving the
youth "eternal summer" (line 9) "in eternal lines" of poetry (line 12)
in Sonnet 18 and asking "old Time" (line 13 of Sonnet 19) not to draw
lines on his "love's fair brow" (line 9 of Sonnet 19).  It would seem
that these poems are related in terms of puns on time (eternal lines of
poetry and defacing lines of wrinkles).  In other words, the sonnets up
to Sonnet 20 do not convey a luxuriating sexual obsession with a young
man as a needed love object nor do they seem jumbled and confused as a
sequence of thought.

Judy Craig
 

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