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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: April ::
Re: Anagrams in Twelfth Night
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0815  Monday, 17 April 2000.

[1]     From:   Steven Marx <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Apr 2000 07:30:27 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?

[2]     From:   David Bishop <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Apr 2000 13:57:47 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?

[3]     From:   Peter Hillyar-Russ <
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        Date:   Saturday, 15 Apr 2000 10:01:35 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?

[4]     From:   Florence Amit <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Apr 2000 14:07:55 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steven Marx <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Apr 2000 07:30:27 -0700
Subject: 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?

I've pondered over those anagrams too...especially in connection with
Toby's "it's all one," (1.5) and "that's all one" (5.1),   Feste's
"that's all one" in 5.1 and his penultimate line, "that's all one our
play is done,"  and the Platonic implications  of Sebastian's words
during the re-cognition scene:

Do I stand there? I never had a brother;
Nor can there be that deity in my nature,
Of here and every where.

A spirit I am indeed;
But am in that dimension grossly clad
Which from the womb I did participate.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Bishop <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Apr 2000 13:57:47 -0400
Subject: 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?

It's a nice point that Viola, Olivia and Malvolio are near anagrams. I
wonder if it has something to do with Shakespeare's apparently somewhat
flippant attitude toward this and other comedies, as expressed in their
names: As You Like It, Much Ado about Nothing, What You Will. He may be
having fun, expressing the ironic detachment of a playful Godlike
playwright. MOAI seems to me meant as a simple code, which Malvolio
fails to see through. It takes the first letter of his name, then the
last, then the next to first, then the next to last. Completed, it would
read MOAILLVO.

Maybe playing around with that code gave Shakespeare the idea for the
names.

David

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Hillyar-Russ <
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Date:           Saturday, 15 Apr 2000 10:01:35 +0100
Subject: Anagrams in Twelfth Night?
Comment:        SHK 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?

Brian Haylett says:
>I
>cannot think of another such coincidence in Shakespeare. Was he being
>lazy or is there more to be said?

It may be worth noting also that Rosalind and Orlando (in As You Like
It) have near anagrams for names.

Peter Hillyar-Russ

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Florence Amit <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Apr 2000 14:07:55 +0000
Subject: 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0800 Anagrams in Twelfth Night?

I do not know what you have come up with in English, but this is for the
Hebrew:

All three of the proper names if in an anagram contain the word lev
meaning heart. 'lamed' , 'bet'  Thus I can construct for Olivia:  My
heart is she.

(Livee hea.) For Viola

My heart loves. (Livee ohav)

For Malvolio I did not need an anagram and have:  To ( or 'above') and
not (to) his heart. M'al veh lo l'levo.

"MOAI" :  certainly suggests Hebrew. There may be a  connection to the
listed names. M' ohav - being in love. (the v is a vav which can also be
a vowel sign.) 'My being in love doth shay my life'.

Another word in anagram is AIUM. (O and U have the same vowel symbol.)
Aium means a threat - "A threat doth sway my life."

Probably there are more alternatives. Shakespeare is spectacular in
Hebrew.

Florence Amit
 

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