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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: April ::
Re: Merchant of Venice
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0832  Tuesday, 18 April 2000.

[1]     From:   Ann Carrigan <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Apr 2000 10:19:58 EDT
        Subj:   Re: Merchant

[2]     From:   Charles Edelman <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Apr 2000 09:04:23 +8/00
        Subj:   Re: Merchant of Venice


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ann Carrigan <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Apr 2000 10:19:58 EDT
Subject:        Re: Merchant

Speaking of Merchant, one of the delights of my 1998 trip to Los Angeles
was a day in the Museum of TV and Radio (there's one in NYC as well.)
One can look through a computerized catalogue and view tapes of rare and
old television shows. I selected a Steve Allen Show because I'd never
seen his old series, with guest stars Sammy Davis, Jr. and Orson Welles.
The entire show is priceless, but the Shakespearean highlight was a
scene with Orson, sitting at a dressing table making up for the part of

If I remember correctly, Welles was going to film or televise a
production of Merchant that never got made?

This is my first post to the SHAKSPER list, though I've been reading for
several weeks.  Hello to all.

Peace,
Ann Carrigan
Orlando, Florida

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Edelman <
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Date:           Tuesday, 18 Apr 2000 09:04:23 +8/00
Subject:        Re: Merchant of Venice

Bassanio learns that he will have to be circumsized when he reads the
scroll in the leaden casket:

If you be well pleased with this
And hold your fortune for your briss
Turn you where your lady is
And claim her with a loving kiss


Charles Edelman,
School of International Cultural and Community Studies
Edith Cowan University
 

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