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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: April ::
Re: "against eloquence"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0876  Friday, 21 April 2000.

[1]     From:   Tom Bishop <
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        Date:   Thursday, 20 Apr 2000 11:14:09 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0864 "against eloquence"

[2]     From:   Arthur D L Lindley <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Apr 2000 10:23:17 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0864 "against eloquence"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Bishop <
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Date:           Thursday, 20 Apr 2000 11:14:09 -0500
Subject: 11.0864 "against eloquence"
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0864 "against eloquence"

Well, Erasmus' "Praise of Folly" leaps immediately to mind, esp.
sections 49 and 50 where Folly speaks of schoolmasters, poets, orators
and writers.  I expect a quick peek in Lucian, one of Erasmus' favorite
models, would also discover something, though I don't have him on hand
to check.  Such anti-encomia were rather a favorite with the early
generation of humanists.  I would be surprised if Rabelais also wrote
nothing on the subject.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur D L Lindley <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Apr 2000 10:23:17 +0800
Subject: 11.0864 "against eloquence"
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0864 "against eloquence"

Machiavelli, in the prefatory letter attached to The Prince.

Arthur Lindley

>Does anyone know of any writers (classical or otherwise known to
>Renaissance writers) who inveigh against eloquence, whether seriously or
>ironically?
 

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