2000

A Hamlet Prequel

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0766  Wednesday, 12 April 2000.

From:           Karen Peterson-Kranz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tue, 11 Apr 2000 23:10:03 +1000
Subject:        A Hamlet Prequel

Greetings, one and all...

Has anyone read Updike's newest, Gertrude and Claudius?  (Or maybe it
was Claudius and Gertrude...?)  I very nearly purchased it yesterday in
our local McBook store, but thought I'd save my $24.95 and ask the
list.  The cover blurb goes on and on about how it's all based on the
Ur-Hamlet and Norse history, etc.  The first page or two didn't look
promising, but who knows.

Karen Peterson-Kranz

Re: Sonnet 20

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0765  Wednesday, 12 April 2000.

[1]     From:   Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Apr 2000 08:31:03 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Sonnet 20

[2]     From:   Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Apr 2000 15:46:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0751 Re: Sonnet 20


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Apr 2000 08:31:03 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Sonnet 20

Thanks to Douglas Chapman for a thoughtful analysis of Sonnet 20 and a
reminder to academics that all too often we do not meet the ideals of
our dual profession. I remember reading Eric Hoffer's newspaper column
as a kid: as I recall, he had a lot of common-sense things to say, as
does Douglas Chapman.

I wonder if our fascination with Sonnet 20 is a mark of changing times.
There is a good argument to be made that in some ways sexuality was
different in Shakespeare's day: to whit, that bi-sexuality was more
common. I wonder if society is moving back in that direction and our
concerns and anxieties about it are being reflected in our views of
Sonnet 20?

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Apr 2000 15:46:54 -0500
Subject: 11.0751 Re: Sonnet 20
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0751 Re: Sonnet 20

Douglas Chapman writes:

<The point is, Sonnet 20 (one of many) is erotic. Could it be
homoerotic?
<Of course. Could it be heteroerotic? Of course. This duality is part of
<the greatness of Shak. Is this not what "The Universality <of Shak." is
<all about?  What's with the denials? "Protecting" Shak. <the man, his
<times, or more likely an individual's prejudices is not <scholarship.

In the interests of "unprotecting Shakespeare" I would like to see an
argument advanced rather than an ad hominem attack.  Some of us
"prickless" pricks thought that the "universality of Shakespeare" meant
that he was more interested in the impact of time on people and events
or perhaps the value of universal ideas as they applied to the universal
human condition as depicted in poetry rather than in the depiction of a
mindless blob of gutter sexuality common to any bestial human willing to
indulge it.

Judy Craig

Now on Fileserver: Revised EDITING E_TEXTS

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0763  Tuesday, 11 April 2000.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, April 11, 2000
Subject:        Now on Fileserver: Revised EDITING E_TEXTS

As of today, SHAKSPEReans may retrieve a revised copy of my essay "'Take
your choice of those that best can ayde your action': Editing and the
Electronic Text" (EDITING E_TEXTS) from the SHAKSPER fileserver.

An earlier version of this paper accompanied by a PowerPoint
presentation was given at the 1998 Shakespeare Association of America
Annual Meeting Panel "The Electronic Text as a Tool in Research and
Teaching," March 21, 1998, in Cleveland, Ohio. The paper was presented
again with a more expanded PowerPoint presentation as the Keynote
Address at the College English Association, Middle Atlantic Group's
annual conference, March 6, 1999. Although the paper is meant to be
heard in conjunction with its PowerPoint counterpoint, the substance of
the presentation is recorded here and published in CEAMagazine. 2000:
3-14).

To retrieve "'Take your choice of those that best can ayde your action":
Editing and the Electronic Text ", send a one-line mail message (without
a subject line) to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., reading "GET EDITING
E_TEXTS".

Should you have difficulty receiving this or any of the files on the
SHAKSPER fileserver, please contact the editor at
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> or <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.

************************************************************************
David Scott Kastan contends in his piece for the 1996 Shakespeare
Studies Forum: Editing Early Modern Texts that "Editing has suddenly
become hot, or, if not exactly hot as an activity to undertake (it does,
after all, involve a lot of very tedious, numbingly cold, work), at
least a hot topic (arguably the hot topic) to debate."  Kastan's
principal reason for this contention centers on the manner in which many
postmodern scholars approach early modern texts: "Never has the
materiality of the texts we study seemed so compelling, so unavoidable,
and so exhilaratingly problematic" (30).  Whether one agrees that
editing is "the hot topic" to debate, certainly much has been written on
the subject in the past fifteen years since Jerome J. McGann's A
Critique of Modern Textual Criticism, prompting many to reexamine the
New Bibliography and their own assumptions about editing and edited
texts.

Revised EDITING E_TEXTS: It's a Mystery

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0764  Wednesday, 12 April 2000.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 12 April 2000
Subject:        Revised EDITING E_TEXTS: It's a Mystery

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

It's a mystery. I made revisions to my essay "'Take your choice of those
that best can ayde your action': Editing and the Electronic Text," but I
somehow or the other managed to send an unrevised copy to the fileserver
and lost all of the revisions I had made.

I have made the revisions again and remounted EDITING E_TEXTS on the
SHAKSPER fileserver.

To retrieve it, send this command

GET EDITING E_TEXTS

to

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A number of members have written me about having trouble retrieving the
file. Because I can no longer simple reply from the
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. account, I will not be able to get back with
you personally until later; however, in most cases, the problem is with
a slight change in the e-mail address you now have and the one you
subscribed to SHAKSPER under.

Anytime you have a problem retrieving a file from the fileserver, please
forward me the error message that you receive so that I can try to
determine what your particular problem is.

Thanks and sorry for the confusion,
Hardy

Re: The Button

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0762  Tuesday, 11 April 2000.

From:           Judith Matthews Craig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 10 Apr 2000 16:20:22 -0500
Subject: 11.0730 Re: The Button
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0730 Re: The Button

In filing my collection of essays over the weekend, I came across an
essay by Dean Frye, "The Context of Lear's Unbuttoning" ELH (vol. 32,
1965), 17-31.  I found it particularly illuminating, especially on the
causes of Lear's madness.

Judy Craig

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