2000

I Need Some Information About Plague

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1127  Wednesday, 31 May 2000.

From:           Wei-Chia Wu <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 22 May 2000 21:40:28 +0800
Subject:        I Need Some Information About Plague

[One of the advantages of an edited and moderated list is that the
membership receives digests of messages in a consistent format; another
is that members do NOT receive private messages sent to the list by
mistake or questions from non-list members, requesting help on this or
that assignment. In the latter case, I forward these questions to Dale
Lyles, who graciously responds to them. On occasion, a message will
arrive from someone who is not a list member but who has a legitimate
request nevertheless. Such is the posting below. If anyone cares to
respond, please do so DIRECTLY to Wei-Chia Wu <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>;
please do not reply to the list. Thanks. -Hardy]

My name  is  Wei-Chia Wu, now I study in the Department of  English in
National Changhua  University of Education in Taiwan.

This semester I have chosen a course "Research Method", and my research
topic is "People's  attitude toward infected people in the sixteenth
century England." And I will emphasize on the three part:

1. how the  people(such as infected people's family and  friends) at
that time deal with the infected people and corpse.
2. government's policy and reaction.
3. different attitude from different classes

And my primary source is poem "A Litany in Time of Plague" by Thomas
Nashe (1567-1601). As for my secondary sources are:

Horrox,Rosemary, trans. and ed. The Black Death. UK: Manchester UP,
1994.

Slack, Paul.The Impact of Plague in Tudor and Stuart  England. Oxford
UP, 1927.

Wilson, F.P. The plague in Shakespear's London. London: Oxford UP, 1927.

and other materials that I found in periodicals and on the web, but
these materials didn't help much. Therefore, may I ask your opinion
about my research topic, and could you give me some suggestions and
directions to look for the materials about plague and the comments about
Nashe's poem? And if you have this kind of information, please tell me,
I will be appreciated. Thank you.

Sincerely Wei-Chia Wu
May 22, 2000.

Package Tour to Stratford

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1126  Wednesday, 31 May 2000.

From:           Hae Ryong Jung <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 May 2000 20:08:19 +0900
Subject:        Package Tour to Stratford

Dear Colleagues,

SHAKSPEReans in Korea would like to make a package tour to Stratford
during the summer or winter season. I would appreciate it if anyone
could give us some information regarding this off-line. My e-mail
address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Thank you for your assistance.

Hae Ryong Jung
Vice President
The Shakespeare Association of Korea

Re: Hamlet Act 4 Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1124  Wednesday, 31 May 2000.

From:           Brian Haylett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 May 2000 20:19:43 +0100
Subject: 11.1108 Hamlet Act 4 Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1108 Hamlet Act 4 Question

>The body is with the King, but the King is not with the body.  The
>King is a thing --

What about 'body' = 'state, body politic' as hidden meaning? The people
support the king, but the king is not on the people's side. (Apologies
if anyone has raised this one while I have been in hospital.)

Brian Haylett

Q: Wolfgang Bauer's *Shakespeare the Sadist*

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1125  Wednesday, 31 May 2000.

From:           Evelyn Gajowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 May 2000 21:52:36 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Wolfgang Bauer's *Shakespeare the Sadist*

Does anyone know how to acquire a copy of Wolfgang Bauer's play,
*Shakespeare the Sadist*?  I'm making this inquiry on behalf of a grad
student who has exhausted various bibliographies, libraries, search
engines, etc.  Thank you in advance for any assistance which anyone
might be able to offer.

Evelyn Gajowski
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Re: James and Elizabeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1123  Wednesday, 31 May 2000.

[1]     From:   David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 May 2000 17:01:38 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth

[2]     From:   Joseph 'Chepe' Lockett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 30 May 2000 12:16:46 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth

[3]     From:   Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 31 May 2000 06:01:14 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 May 2000 17:01:38 GMT
Subject: 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth

At the risk of prolonging what might seem a tangential issue for this
list, a few more thoughts about the transition from Elizabeth to James.
I'm sure the picture was a complicated one - and certainly fear,
mistrust and dislike of the Scots surfaced quite quickly - James himself
recognised as much in his 1607 speech to Parliament.  (The 'Loyal
Subjectes Advertisement' objected that 'respect at the court of the Scot
by all the attendant officers their is so partial as the English find
themselves much disgraced - ed. J.D.  Mackie, SHR 23, 1925)).  So too,
Cecil complained that 'I wishe I waited now in her Presence chamber,
with ease at my foode and rest in my bedde.  I am pushed from the shore
of comfort, and know not where the wyndes and waves of Court will bear
me'.

Political and religious objections to James's policies, too, could be
and were articulated early.  But I would still want to maintain that the
systematic deployment of a nostalgic recreation of the days of Elizabeth
(one conveniently forgetting the hardships and disillusionment of the
1590s) took a few years to get going.  Geoffrey Goodman, admittedly
himself writing many years later, said: 'But after a few years, when we
had experience of the Scottish government, then in disparagement of the
Scots, and in hate and detestation of them, the Queen did seem to
revive; then was her memory much magnified'.

So it would seem to me important to distinguish who it was that objected
to James, and on what particular and private respect, and then to trace
carefully the growth of the rhetoric of retrospective idealisation of
Elizabeth.

Where, in all this, one might ask, does Cranmer's eulogy at the end of
Henry VIII fit?

David Lindley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph 'Chepe' Lockett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 May 2000 12:16:46 -0500
Subject: 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth

Quoth Florence Amit:
> Surely the "he- bona", he is good, poured into a dying monarch's ears,
> was the daily dose that Elizabeth had to endure during her last days.

Ms. Amit's suppositions on Shakespeare's Hebrew are always interesting,
if often far-fetched, but here she does violence to the Latin as well.
Latin adjectives are gendered.  "He-bonus" is the required form, else we
become subject to much the same sexual confusion that seems to
characterize James and this thread.  :-)  "He-bona" is purely sloppy
reaching at shadowy linguistics.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcus Dahl <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 31 May 2000 06:01:14 EDT
Subject: 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1113 Re: James and Elizabeth

A few questions for those more in the know than myself re: James and
Elizabeth

(1) What primary sources do you use for your knowledge of 'popular' (as
opposed to 'courtly') dislike of James' rule in contrast to the
*romantic* popularity of Elizabeth ?

(2) What sources do you have as to the firm dates of Shakespeare's texts
supposedly relevent to the issue: ie: Hamlet (1587?1602? etc) King Lear,
Measure For Measure?

(3) On what evidence do you pejoratively contrast the *favouritism* of
James to that of Elizabeth? ie Dudley, Essex vs Villiers, Carr, etc.
Raleigh's opinion for example is surely to be treated with several
pinches of salt given his imprisonment for complicity in the Main
Treason (Arrabella Stuart).

(4) Why the personal tone of diasapproval (Barton et al) directed toward
complex historical figures? (whether James or Elizabeth) Have you all
developed 20/20 historical hindsight?

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