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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: May ::
Re: Shakespearean Insults
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0996  Tuesday, 9 May 2000.

[1]     From:   David Knauer <
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        Date:   Monday, 08 May 2000 12:45:14 CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0973 Re: Shakespearean Insults

[2]     From:   Edna Z. Boris <
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        Date:   Monday, 8 May 2000 20:39:40 -0400
        Subj:   Insult Thanks

[3]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Monday, 08 May 2000 12:45:14 CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0973 Re: Shakespearean Insults


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Knauer <
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Date:           Monday, 08 May 2000 12:45:14 CDT
Subject: 11.0973 Re: Shakespearean Insults
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0973 Re: Shakespearean Insults

Sean Lawrence writes,

>I wonder if anyone has pushed this sort of table further, to write
>(say) a Shakespearean tragedy. The user (or computer) would choose a
>locale, a tragic hero, something he does, who urges him on, and the
>form in which nemesis arrives. Umberto Eco did something similar, but
>not specifically Shakespearean, in an essay called "make your own
>movie." Such a plot-generating engine might be handy for teaching
>certain types of structuralism.

Several titles of such plot-generating software are already available
for screenwriting, perhaps reflecting the popular American fantasy of
virtually anyone selling a million-dollar script to Hollywood. The
results seem to range from the wacky to the banal, suggesting that much
of what we watch might just as well be authored by computer. I imagine
something similar also exists for writers of fiction, and of course
there's always Vladimir Propp and Northrop Frye to help out in a pinch.

Dave Knauer

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edna Z. Boris <
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Date:           Monday, 8 May 2000 20:39:40 -0400
Subject:        Insult Thanks

Thanks to those who quickly answered my question about Jerry Maguire and
the Shakespearean Insults.  A printed version can be found on p. 125 of
Peggy O'Brien's Shakespeare Set Free: Teaching Romeo and Juliet,
Macbeth, A Midsummer Night's Dream.  New York: Washington Square Press,
1993.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Monday, 08 May 2000 12:45:14 CDT
Subject: 11.0973 Re: Shakespearean Insults
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0973 Re: Shakespearean Insults

Since it has just been brought up, I have two favorite insults from the
plays themselves.

For the first, I ask the pardon of my late Welsh grandmother, Margaret
Morgan Cook.

<Glend.>        I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
<Hot.>          Why, so can I, or so can any man,
                But will they come when you do call for them?
                        (Henry the Fourth Pt1 3.1.52-54)

For the second, no apologies.

<King.>         Where is Polonius?
<Ham.>          In heaven, send thither to see; if your
                messenger find him not there, seek him i' th' other
                place yourself.
                        (Tragedy of Hamlet 4.3.32-37)
 

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