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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: May ::
Re: Shakespearean Insults
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1003  Wednesday, 10 May 2000.

[1]     From:   Dale Lyles <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 May 2000 10:40:07 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0996 Re: Shakespearean Insults

[2]     From:   Michael Best <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 9 May 2000 11:07:28 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.0996 Re: Shakespearean Insults


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <
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Date:           Tuesday, 9 May 2000 10:40:07 EDT
Subject: 11.0996 Re: Shakespearean Insults
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0996 Re: Shakespearean Insults

For one of our Funny Things [comedy evenings], I wrote a series of brief
"Short Shakespeare" scenes, in which the plays come to abrupt
conclusions when the characters actually behave as real people would,
i.e., seeing through lame disguises, realizing that people think they
know you because your twin lives there, etc.  I could dig those out if
anyone's interested.

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company
Newnan, GA

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Best <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 9 May 2000 11:07:28 -0700
Subject: 11.0996 Re: Shakespearean Insults
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.0996 Re: Shakespearean Insults

I sometimes recommend to my students that they memorize Kent's wonderful
description of Oswald in case they need it in a traffic accident.

OSWALD:  What dost thou know me for?
KENT:  A knave; a rascal; an eater of broken meats;
a base, proud, shallow, beggarly, three-suited,
hundred-pound, filthy, worsted-stocking knave;
a lily-livered, action-taking knave, a whoreson,
glass-gazing, super-serviceable finical rogue;
one-trunk-inheriting slave; one that wouldst be a
bawd, in way of good service, and art nothing but
the composition of a knave, beggar, coward, pandar,
and the son and heir of a mongrel bitch
   (Lr 2.2.11-20)

Michael Best
Coordinating Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions
<http://web.uvic.ca/shakespeare>
 

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