Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: May ::
Re: Finding Truth on the Stage
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.1004  Wednesday, 10 May 2000.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 9 May 2000 10:48:40 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.1002 Finding Truth on the Stage

[2]     From:   Tony Rust <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 9 May 2000 18:53:59 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.1002 Finding Truth on the Stage


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 9 May 2000 10:48:40 EDT
Subject: 11.1002 Finding Truth on the Stage
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.1002 Finding Truth on the Stage

Jean Cocteau, in a programme note: The point is not to put life on the
stage, but to make the stage live.

To answer part of your question with my own rule of thumb: it is more
important that the paying audience laugh or cry than that the actor do
it.

You ask for "truth". Well, art has its own. As James Agate wrote in the
twenties of [yikes!] last century, it does not illumine science or
knowledge, but the scientist and those who would know. It's not a night
school.

    Harry Hill

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tony Rust <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 9 May 2000 18:53:59 -0400
Subject: 11.1002 Finding Truth on the Stage
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.1002 Finding Truth on the Stage

What is truth? No one knows. It changes from year to year, season to
season.  Every new style of theater telling retells what "truth" is.
Shakespeare himself asked his actors in Hamlet's speech to the players
to approach the "truth" in their playing. Each and every theatrical
epoch has its own truth or more often truths.

The important thing is the storytelling.

How it is communicated can change in myriad ways.

There is truth within these great texts, but there is no way to say how
you may approach them with truth on stage.

Shakespeare's characters are more alive and real and have more important
or interesting stories to tell than most authors, but it is our job to
make those stories live. By that, I do not say that we must make them
mundane, day-to-day, or natural, though those elements may well be a
part of making them live.

The theater uses what is at hand to tell stories that effect us. Trust
the story and the "truth" will live for itself.

Tony
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.