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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: December ::
Re: Shakespearean Pairings
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2219  Monday, 4 December 2000

[1]     From:   Lisa Hopkins <
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        Date:   Friday, 01 Dec 2000 16:33:03 +0000
        Subj:   Pairing with Macbeth

[2]     From:   Tom Bishop <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 Dec 2000 11:52:39 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings

[3]     From:   Christopher Moore <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 Dec 2000 12:29:30 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings

[4]     From:   Carol Barton <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 Dec 2000 15:12:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings

[5]     From:   Paul E. Doniger <
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        Date:   Friday, 1 Dec 2000 19:40:24 -0800
        Subj:   Fw: SHK 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins <
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Date:           Friday, 01 Dec 2000 16:33:03 +0000
Subject:        Pairing with Macbeth

Arden of Faversham might make an interesting pairing with Macbeth.  Both
focus on a marital relationship; Macbeth is a tragedy of state with a
lot of domestic detail, and Arden is a domestic tragedy with a number of
references to state affairs; and both have some scenes which one might
want to read in an allegorical way.

Lisa Hopkins
Sheffield Hallam University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Bishop <
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Date:           Friday, 1 Dec 2000 11:52:39 -0500
Subject: 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings

Celia Maddox asks:

>For a course I'm assembling, I wonder if anyone can suggest
>non-Shakespearean plays (modern or contemporary) that have worked well
>alongside a Shakespearean play. I'd particularly like to find a mate for
>Macbeth. The course is for adults and I'd like to find something more
>provocative than, say, Macbird. Please reply off-line or on.

How about Genet's "The Balcony" -- ambition, dangerous women, and dark
fantasies. Definitely for adults.

Tom

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christopher Moore <
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Date:           Friday, 1 Dec 2000 12:29:30 -0800
Subject: 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings

RICHARD III with Oliver Stones "Scarface".  Stone used Richard III as a
model for the script.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <
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Date:           Friday, 1 Dec 2000 15:12:20 -0500
Subject: 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings

Celia Maddox asks,

> For a course I'm assembling, I wonder if anyone can suggest
> non-Shakespearean plays (modern or contemporary) that have worked well
> alongside a Shakespearean play. I'd particularly like to find a mate for
> Macbeth. The course is for adults and I'd like to find something more
> provocative than, say, Macbird. Please reply off-line or on.

Celia, I would do the _Agamemnon_  from the _Oresteia_, and/or _Medea_.
I like to pair those with _Hamlet_, too: Clytaemnestra and Medea (or
Media, as one student kept referring to her) are wonderful foils for
wussy Gertrude, and could be the triplet siblings of Lady M. Adult wives
are better able to understand their motivation than post high-schoolers,
as well.

All best,
Carol Barton

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul E. Doniger <
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Date:           Friday, 1 Dec 2000 19:40:24 -0800
Subject: 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings
Comment:        Fw: SHK 11.2214 Shakespearean Pairings

Off the top of my head: I think it might be interesting to pair
_Macbeth_ with something like _The Sorrows of Frederick_ by Romulus
Linney; both deal with power perverting an otherwise decent,
intelligent, even superior human being.

You also might look at pairing _Troilus and Cressida_ with almost
anything by Jean Anouilh (my favorites are _The Traveller Without
Luggage_ , _Becket_, and _Poor Bitos_); many of his plays seem to deal
with the dangers of pretending to be who you are not, or refusing to
"play one's role." I think this is a main theme of _T&C_ as well.

Good Luck,
Paul E. Doniger
 

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