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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: December ::
Re: Hamlet's Books
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2256  Thursday, 7 December 2000

[1]     From:   Ed Kranz <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Dec 2000 12:20:03 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2246 Re: Hamlet's Books

[2]     From:   Don Bloom <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 05 Dec 2000 11:35:44 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2246 Re: Hamlet's Books

[3]     From:   Arthur Lindley <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Dec 2000 10:25:25 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2246 idle curiosity


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Kranz <
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Date:           Tuesday, 5 Dec 2000 12:20:03 -0500
Subject: 11.2246 Re: Hamlet's Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2246 Re: Hamlet's Books

Paul-You read much too literally. I thought Sean's comment was very
funny!

Ed

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Bloom <
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Date:           Tuesday, 05 Dec 2000 11:35:44 -0600
Subject: 11.2246 Re: Hamlet's Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2246 Re: Hamlet's Books

Don't believe a word that man Lawrence writes. "Caviar to the General"
was written in 1934 by Noel Coward about a British officer in India
whose daughter elopes with the son of a rajah. He is (of course)
devastated by this example of miscegenation (see J. Q. Adams) until a
character who wanders in from a production of "H.M.S Pinafore" reveals
that the daughter was not his off-spring at all but the product of union
between his wife and a Irish sergeant while he was serving in the Boer
War. As I recall, the wife then runs off with the sergeant, and the play
ends with the general trying to decide whether to take the offer of Miss
Buttercup to join the "Pinafore" production as Sir Joseph Porter's
younger brother, or kill himself. It was never (I believe) much of a
success.

Mr. Lawrence may have been thinking of "No Salads in the Lines," a lost
play from the Theatre Wars, written by Middleton, Rowley, Dekker,
Heywood, Drayton, Pierce, Fenner and Beane.

Sincerely,
don

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Lindley <
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Date:           Wednesday, 6 Dec 2000 10:25:25 +0800
Subject: 11.2246 idle curiosity
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2246 idle curiosity

Paul Doniger mentioned Hamlet's 'caviare to the general' the day after I
read a New York Times food article which insisted that caviar was not
particularly expensive until the sturgeon stocks began to shrink in the
late 19th C. and that our version of the stuff as a prototypical
delicacy is a modern invention.  In this case, I would assume that
Hamlet's information is better than the Times's, but does anyone have
any facts on the matter or know who might?  (And, yes, as a matter of
fact, I AM avoiding marking.)

Arthur Lindley
 

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