2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2259  Thursday, 7 December 2000

[1]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Dec 2000 15:27:09 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2235 Re: Shakespearean Pairings

[2]     From:   Robert Shaughnessy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Dec 2000 20:33:50 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2235 Re: Shakespearean Pairings


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Dec 2000 15:27:09 -0500
Subject: 11.2235 Re: Shakespearean Pairings
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2235 Re: Shakespearean Pairings

One of my colleagues made these suggestions

Shakespearean pairings:

Othello and Romeo and Juliet (and a bit of Hamlet) -- Goodnight
Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet) by Ann Marie MacDonald
(a feminist comic romp, revisioning the tragic heroine)

Othello  -- Harlem Duet by Djanet Sears
(a "prequel" to Othello, investigating "blackness/whiteness")

The Tempest -- A Tempest by Aime Cesaire
(postcolonial revisioning)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Shaughnessy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Dec 2000 20:33:50 -0000
Subject: 11.2235 Re: Shakespearean Pairings
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2235 Re: Shakespearean Pairings

Howard Brenton's dream play Thirteenth Night (a fantasy about the rise
and demise of a radical Labour government[!]) goes nicely with Macbeth,
although readers outside the UK might find its politics hard to fathom.
For King Lear, there's Edward Bond's Lear and Bingo (yes, that again),
Howard Barker's Seven Lears, Gordon Bottomley's King Lear's Wife, The
Women's Theatre Group's Lear's Daughters and Barrie Keeffe's King of
England.  And wasn't there once an episode of Star Trek that revolved
around an ageing interplanetary perpetrator of genocide who had
reinveted himself as a Shaekspearean actor? Entitled, I think, 'The
Conscience of the King'?

Robert Shaughnessy

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