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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: December ::
Re: Quotation Identification
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2268  Friday, 8 December 2000

[1]     From:   Paul Franssen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 07 Dec 2000 15:59:17 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

[2]     From:   Manuela Rossini <
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        Date:   Thursday, 07 Dec 2000 16:09:06 ?
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

[3]     From:   Tanya Gough <
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        Date:   Thursday, 7 Dec 2000 10:47:16 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

[4]     From:   Gabriel Egan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 7 Dec 2000 15:48:55 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

[5]     From:   Tom Dale Keever <
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        Date:   Thursday, 7 Dec 2000 11:31:28 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Franssen <
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Date:           Thursday, 07 Dec 2000 15:59:17 +0100
Subject: 11.2250 Quotation Identification
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

Alan Somerset asks for the source of a quotation. Typing a few words
into the Alta Vista search engine, enclosed by quotation marks, yields
the following result:

                                      Ben Jonson. 1573-1637

                                    191. The Noble Balm

                           HIGH-SPIRITED friend,

                           I send nor balms nor cor'sives to your wound:
                            Your fate hath found

                           A gentler and more agile hand to tend

                           The cure of that which is but corporal;
                              And doubtful days, which were named
critical,

                                   Have made their fairest flight

                                   And now are out of sight.
                         Yet doth some wholesome physic for the mind
                                    Wrapp'd in this paper lie,
                          Which in the taking if you misapply,

                                   You are unkind.
                                   Your covetous hand,
                           Happy in that fair honour it hath gain'd,
                                   Must now be rein'd.
                          True valour doth her own renown command

                           In one full action; nor have you now more
                       To do, than be a husband of that store.
                           Think but how dear you bought
                           This fame which you have caught:
                     Such thoughts will make you more in love with
truth.

                                   'Tis wisdom, and that high,
                           For men to use their fortune reverently,
                                   Even in youth.

Paul Franssen
Department of English
University of Utrecht
The Netherlands

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Manuela Rossini <
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Date:           Thursday, 07 Dec 2000 16:09:06 ?
Subject: 11.2250 Quotation Identification
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

Dear Alan Somerset

It's Ben Jonson's poem "The Noble Balm" - websearch is the word:

                           HIGH-SPIRITED friend,

                           I send nor balms nor cor'sives to your wound:
                            Your fate hath found

                           A gentler and more agile hand to tend

                           The cure of that which is but corporal;
                              And doubtful days, which were named
critical,

                                   Have made their fairest flight

                                   And now are out of sight.
                         Yet doth some wholesome physic for the mind
                                    Wrapp'd in this paper lie,
                          Which in the taking if you misapply,

                                   You are unkind.
                                   Your covetous hand,
                           Happy in that fair honour it hath gain'd,
                                   Must now be rein'd.
                          True valour doth her own renown command

                           In one full action; nor have you now more
                       To do, than be a husband of that store.
                           Think but how dear you bought
                           This fame which you have caught:
                     Such thoughts will make you more in love with
truth.

                                   'Tis wisdom, and that high,
                           For men to use their fortune reverently,
                                   Even in youth.

Best,
Manuela Rossini
University of Basel

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <
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Date:           Thursday, 7 Dec 2000 10:47:16 -0500
Subject: 11.2250 Quotation Identification
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

>Think but how dear your bought
>This same which you have caught;
>Such thoughts will make you more in love with truth.

Its from Ben Jonson's poem "The Noble Balm".

Tanya Gough

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[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 7 Dec 2000 15:48:55 -0000
Subject: 11.2250 Quotation Identification
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

Alan Somerset asks for the source of

>Think but how dear your bought
>This same which you have caught;
>Such thoughts will make you more in love with truth.

It's from Jonson's ode "High spirited friend" in Underwoods.

Gabriel Egan

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 7 Dec 2000 11:31:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.2250 Quotation Identification
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2250 Quotation Identification

>A colleague is directing a play which contains the following quotation
>within its lines:
>
>Think but how dear your bought
>This same which you have caught;
>Such thoughts will make you more in love with truth.

                                      Ben Jonson. 1573-1637

                                    191. The Noble Balm


                           HIGH-SPIRITED friend,

                           I send nor balms nor cor'sives to your wound:
                            Your fate hath found

                           A gentler and more agile hand to tend

                           The cure of that which is but corporal;
                              And doubtful days, which were named
critical,

                                   Have made their fairest flight

                                   And now are out of sight.
                         Yet doth some wholesome physic for the mind
                                    Wrapp'd in this paper lie,
                          Which in the taking if you misapply,

                                   You are unkind.
                                   Your covetous hand,
                           Happy in that fair honour it hath gain'd,
                                   Must now be rein'd.
                          True valour doth her own renown command

                           In one full action; nor have you now more
                       To do, than be a husband of that store.
                           Think but how dear you bought
                           This fame which you have caught:
                     Such thoughts will make you more in love with
truth.

                                   'Tis wisdom, and that high,
                           For men to use their fortune reverently,
                                   Even in youth.

Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. 1919. The Oxford Book of English Verse:
1250-1900.
                                      - - -
                              Tom Dale Keever
                            Columbia University
                            
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                   http://www.columbia.edu/~tdk3
 

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