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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: December ::
Quotation Identification
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2288  Monday, 10 December 2000

[1]     From:   Fran Teague <
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        Date:   Friday, 8 Dec 2000 10:39:48 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2267 Quotation Sources

[2]     From:   Diana Price <
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        Date:   Friday, 8 Dec 2000 15:35:33 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2267 Quotation Sources


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <
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Date:           Friday, 8 Dec 2000 10:39:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 11.2267 Quotation Sources
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2267 Quotation Sources

The OED says "stock of well-penn'd plays is from Marston, Scourge of
Villainy, 1598.

I tried various forms of "miming and jigging" in the Google Search
Engine, OED, and various Chadwyck Healy databases to no avail.

Fran Teague <http://www.arches.uga.edu/~fteague>

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Diana Price <
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Date:           Friday, 8 Dec 2000 15:35:33 -0500
Subject: 11.2267 Quotation Sources
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2267 Quotation Sources

| --Shakespeare's "stock of well-penned plays" (did some contemporary
| playwright allude to Shakespeare's work using this phrase?)

This phrase is from John Marston's satire X, "The Scourge of Villainy"
(1598):

I set thy lips abroach, from whence doth flow
Naught but pure Juliet and Romeo.
Say, who acts best? Drusus, or Roscio?
Now I have him, that ne'er of aught did speak
But when of plays or Players he did treat.
H'ath made a common-place book out of plays,
And speaks in print, at least what e'er he says
Is warranted by Curtain plaudities.
If e're you heard him courting Lesbia's eyes;
Say, (Courteous Sir) speaks he not movingly
>From out some new pathetic Tragedy?
He writes, he rails, he jests, he courts, what not,
And all from out his huge long scraped stock
Of well penned plays.

Diana Price
 

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