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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: December ::
Re: Type Symbols
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2339  Friday, 15 December 2000

[1]     From:   Carol Barton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Dec 2000 13:15:55 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2328 Re: Type Symbols

[2]     From:   David Crosby <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Dec 2000 15:36:48 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.2328 Re: Type Symbols


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Barton <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Dec 2000 13:15:55 -0500
Subject: 11.2328 Re: Type Symbols
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2328 Re: Type Symbols

Any word (or string of symbols) used to take the place of an expletive
is at the very least a "taboo variant" -- as in "gosh darn" for
"goddamn," or "freakin'" for . . . that other thing.

Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah, Joyous Kwanzaa, Bright Winter Solstice,
and wonderful anything else you may be celebrating (the end of the
semester?)!  Happy New Year, too!

Carol Barton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Crosby <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Dec 2000 15:36:48 -0600
Subject: 11.2328 Re: Type Symbols
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.2328 Re: Type Symbols

John Robinson suggests "wingdings" and Fran Teague offers "dingbats,"
but the characters depicted below are actually common typesetting
symbols that are used in setting text, and each has an individual name:
percent sign, at sign, pound or number sign, circumflex, question mark,
dollar sign, asterisk, ampersand.

Dingbats and wingdings can be seen by checking out the fonts installed
on many versions of MS Word or Corel Wordperfect. (For dingbats look in
your font list under Zapf.) Dingbats are decorative graphics, many of
which resemble pinwheels, and have no resemblance to text characters.
Wingdings seem to be a collection of useful graphic symbols such as
arrows, triangles, boxes and the like.

The Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) offers "dingbat" in
the sense of little objects that can be used as thrown missiles or
projectiles.  They also cite the usage made familiar by Archie Bunker in
"All in the Family," where he persistently refers to Edith as a dingbat,
suggesting that she is not quite all there. Perhaps she has been hit in
the head by too many projectiles. It connects this usage with an early
20th century comic strip, "Dingbats," created by George Harriman. Now if
someone can tell us whether characters in that strip ever had their
profane language bleeped by "dingbats," we might be onto something.

Any pop culture experts reading the list during this exam season?

Dave
 

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