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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: November ::
Re: Shakespearean Resources
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2065  Friday, 10 November 2000.

[1]     From:   Edward Pixley <
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        Date:   Thursday, 09 Nov 2000 09:19:34 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources

[2]     From:   Michael Friedman <
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        Date:   Thursday, 09 Nov 2000 09:54:48 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Pixley <
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Date:           Thursday, 09 Nov 2000 09:19:34 -0500
Subject: 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources

In this august group, I won't classify myself as an authority; however,
I'm always nervous about how-to-teach books -- on any subject, but
especially in the arts.  Since the possibilities for either play are
legion, what I find best is to get some kind of approach to the play
that excites me so that I can impart that excitement to my class.  With
MforM, persuasive critical study ranges all the way from G. Wilson
Knight's treatment of it as something akin to a morality play to
Josephine Waters Bennett's treatment as a court entertainment.  My
classes have had the most fun reading and/or seeing the play with two or
three of the most divergent critical points of view in front of them at
the same time.

I have never taught MV, but were I to do so, the critical studies are
certainly as widely based as on MforM, and I think the students could
have a blast discovering them.

Ed Pixley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <
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Date:           Thursday, 09 Nov 2000 09:54:48 -0500
Subject: 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources

I don't know of any books on teaching those plays in particular, but I
am aware of a very interesting and innovative article in Selected Papers
from the West Virginia Shakespeare and Renaissance Association 17
(1994): 104-11.  It's called "'Let My Trial Be Mine Own Confession':
Angelo and the Mock Trial Experience in the College Classroom" and it
was written by Jane Carducci and Vicki Boynton.

Michael D. Friedman
University of Scranton

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