2000

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2065  Friday, 10 November 2000.

[1]     From:   Edward Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 09 Nov 2000 09:19:34 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources

[2]     From:   Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 09 Nov 2000 09:54:48 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Pixley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 09 Nov 2000 09:19:34 -0500
Subject: 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources

In this august group, I won't classify myself as an authority; however,
I'm always nervous about how-to-teach books -- on any subject, but
especially in the arts.  Since the possibilities for either play are
legion, what I find best is to get some kind of approach to the play
that excites me so that I can impart that excitement to my class.  With
MforM, persuasive critical study ranges all the way from G. Wilson
Knight's treatment of it as something akin to a morality play to
Josephine Waters Bennett's treatment as a court entertainment.  My
classes have had the most fun reading and/or seeing the play with two or
three of the most divergent critical points of view in front of them at
the same time.

I have never taught MV, but were I to do so, the critical studies are
certainly as widely based as on MforM, and I think the students could
have a blast discovering them.

Ed Pixley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 09 Nov 2000 09:54:48 -0500
Subject: 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2053 Q: Shakespearean Resources

I don't know of any books on teaching those plays in particular, but I
am aware of a very interesting and innovative article in Selected Papers
from the West Virginia Shakespeare and Renaissance Association 17
(1994): 104-11.  It's called "'Let My Trial Be Mine Own Confession':
Angelo and the Mock Trial Experience in the College Classroom" and it
was written by Jane Carducci and Vicki Boynton.

Michael D. Friedman
University of Scranton
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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