Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: November ::
Re: Spit in His Mouth
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2099  Wednesday, 15 November 2000.

[1]     From:   Arthur Lindley <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Nov 2000 11:15:40 +0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2089 Re: Spit in His Mouth

[2]     From:   Syd Kasten <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Nov 2000 07:05:16 +0200 (IST)
        Subj:   SHK 11.2089 Re: Spit in His Mouth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Lindley <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Nov 2000 11:15:40 +0800
Subject: 11.2089 Re: Spit in His Mouth
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2089 Re: Spit in His Mouth

I find this method also works well with undergraduates.

Arthur Lindley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Syd Kasten <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Nov 2000 07:05:16 +0200 (IST)
Subject: Re: Spit in His Mouth
Comment:        SHK 11.2089 Re: Spit in His Mouth

The thread on spitting in a dog's mouth brought to mind a TV documentary
on wild canines.  Among the gems photographed was the way in which the
cubs in the nest were nourished by the returning hunters.  Unlike
felines, who drag their kill to a safe storage place, it seems that
canines store excess food in the stomach.  Returning to the nest the
hunter faces the cub, who proceeds to lick his face around the mouth.
This sets off a reflex causing the hunter to regurgitate some of the
contents of his stomach, providing the cub with a warm, partially
predigested meal.  Sounds disgusting, but that's nature for you.  My
experience with dogs is limited, but I did have special relation with a
dog my son owned.  One of his signs of greeting was to lick my face
(Standing on his hind legs he was about as tall as I was).  I guess that
either because he was well fed, or had matured from cubhood or, being
domesticated, he had evolved enough he did not seem to be disappointed
at not getting his free meal.

Best wishes,
Syd Kasten
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.