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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: November ::
Re: British "strangers"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2112  Friday, 17 November 2000.

[1]     From:   William Proctor Williams <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Nov 2000 11:58:36 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"

[2]     From:   David Schalkwyk<
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        Date:   Friday, 17 Nov 2000 09:25:29 SAST-2
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"

[3]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Thursday, 16 Nov 2000 08:55:18 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Nov 2000 11:58:36 -0500
Subject: 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"

I hope I have not missed anything in this exchange, but I believe the
original question was about the use of the term in the Early Modern
period in England.  During this time, at least in the Stationers'
Company, but probably in the other craft guilds, or companies, the term
"stranger" seems to have been usually applied to those coming from the
Continent and "foreigner" applied to those from the British Isles who
were not freemen of the City of London.  However, as I read the records
the real distinction with either word was freedom of the City vs. the
rest of the planet.  See Arber and Greg & Boswell for more.  Those on
the list with greater knowledge of the other companies (Merchant
Taylors, Goldsmiths, Grocers, etc.) than I have may know more.

William Proctor Williams

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk<
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Date:           Friday, 17 Nov 2000 09:25:29 SAST-2
Subject: 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"

This information is not apposite to the question of whether the English
are strangers in Britain, but it might nevertheless interest members of
the list to know that the English carpetgbaggers who flooded into the
old Transvaal Republic in the late nineteenth century after the
discovery of gold on the Witwatersrand were derisively known as
"uitlanders"--"strangers" or "foreigners".  The Kruger government's
attempts to disenfranchise them are given as one of the reasons for the
Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), by which the Transvaal and its gold became
part of the Empire.  A contingent of Irish volunteers fought against the
Empire on the side of the Boer Republics, so it is not unusual to have
the Irish flag flying alongside those of the old republics at Boer-war
memorials in South Africa.   As an Afrikaans-speaking boy in the
predominantly English-speaking, white areas of Natal my father was made
to feel a stranger because his forebears a generation earlier had called
English-speaking people "uitlanders".

David Schalkwyk
Chair
English Department
University of Cape Town

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Thursday, 16 Nov 2000 08:55:18 +0000
Subject: 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2108 Re: British "strangers"

Before James I "unified" the two nations, wouldn't Scots have been
rightly considered foreigners? And wouldn't most Irish as well, those
who lived outside "the Pale"?

Stephanie Hughes
 

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