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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: November ::
Re: British "strangers"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2140  Tuesday, 21 November 2000.

[1]     From:   Marcus Dahl <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Nov 2000 06:47:00 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2127 Re: British "strangers"

[2]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Monday, 20 Nov 2000 14:09:44 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2127 Re: British "strangers"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcus Dahl <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Nov 2000 06:47:00 EST
Subject: 11.2127 Re: British "strangers"
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2127 Re: British "strangers"

Re: "Strangers"

I find Sam Small's (presumably knowingly) provocative account of
"Strangers" a little pat so I thought this section from my favourite pat
historian might add to things: ("strangers" definition at the bottom for
those of a skipping frame of mind).

...The English or "Saxons" as they are sometimes called were a race of
people who lived in the land bordering on the North Sea between what is
now called Denmark and Holland. They belonged to the great Teutonic
race, which inhabited the middle of Europe from the Baltic down to the
Alps. Of the English who settled in Britain there were three tribes:-
[note singular absence in this def'n of the mythic construct "celts"]

(1) The Jutes, who originally dwelt in the North of Jutland
(2) The Angles, who dwelt in the South of Denmark
(3) The Saxons, who inhabited the district now called Hanover

These three races, the Jutes, Saxons and Angles were afterwards known
amongst themselves as the "English". They held all the East, South East
and central parts of the island from the Firth of Forth to the English
Channel, and founded seven principle kingdoms to which the name of
Heptarchy has been given. These kingdoms were:-

(1) The Kingdom of Kent -founded by the Jutes

(2, 3, 4) The Kingdoms of Sussex, Wessex, Essex - founded by the Saxons.

(5,6,7) The Kingdoms of Northumbria, East Anglia and Mercia - founded by
the Angles.

The boundaries of these kingdoms were not definitely fixed, as the
boundaries of kingdoms are now. The Anglo-Saxon tribes were constantly
at war with one another, each trying to get the upper hand, so that the
kingdoms were often broken up and as often pieced together again.
Sometimes the greater part of the country acknowledged the supremacy of
one of these kingdoms, and sometimes that of another, and a very long
period elapsed before the English were united into one nation [here even
my love of the pat wilts somewhat].  This want of unity weakened the
English and made them an easy prey to invaders like the Northmen.

Fate of the Ancient Britons:

The struggle between the Britons and the English was long and deadly. As
the land was gradually occupied by the new-comers the Britains were
either put to death or driven out and compelled to take refuge in the
fens, woods and mountains of the unsubdued West. Those who survived were
called Welsh (i.e.  "foreigners" or "strangers") by the English, but
Kymry (i.e. "comrades") by themselves.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Monday, 20 Nov 2000 14:09:44 +0000
Subject: 11.2127 Re: British "strangers"
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2127 Re: British "strangers"

But why did the Puritans who settled the Plymouth Colony refer to the
secular colonists who made up about half the settlement "Strangers"
while they called themselves "Saints" when the strangers were every bit
as English?

Stephanie Hughes
 

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