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Home :: Archive :: 2000 :: November ::
Re: Hamlet's Books
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.2194  Thursday, 30 November 2000

[1]     From:   David Knauer <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 2000 11:02:56 -0600
        Subj:   SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 2000 15:20:31 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

[3]     From:   Peterson-Kranz Karen <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 2000 14:33:21 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

[4]     From:   John Briggs <
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        Date:   Thursday, 30 Nov 2000 10:57:30 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

[5]     From:   Stephanie Hughes <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Nov 2000 17:50:12 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Knauer <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 2000 11:02:56 -0600
Subject: Re: Hamlet's Books
Comment:        SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

Bill Godshalk and others may be interested to read P. K. Ayers,
"Reading, Writing and Hamlet," Shakespeare Quarterly 44 (1993): 423-39,
in which the argument is made that Claudius represents an older, more
oral epistemology and Hamlet a more recent literary one. I don't recall
if Ayers specifically links Hamlet's literacy to the Reformation
emphasis on individualized reading of the Bible, as opposed to hearing
Latin sermons, but it wouldn't be out of order.

Dave Knauer

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 2000 15:20:31 -0500
Subject: 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

Roy Flannagan:

>We know
>he has read Vergil, because of the way his inserted speech (wherever it
>is) handles material from the Aeneid.

But Hamlet is supposed to be quoting a play here, isn't he?  I would
take this as another example of Hamlet's knowledge of the theatre,
rather than his knowledge of the Aeneid.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peterson-Kranz Karen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 2000 14:33:21 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

> I have
> forgotten most of Cicero
> on old age, but I don't think Hamlet is alluding to
> it when he pictures
> hopeless old men, as in Polonius (Jaques does the
> same number on old
> men).  Shakespeare does not seem to have held much
> of a case for Cicero,
> judging by the way his death is treated in Julius
> Caesar.

He may not have liked it much, but I suspect Shakespeare, and perhaps
even Hamlet, read Cicero's De oratore.

Cheers,
Karen Peterson-Kranz

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <
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Date:           Thursday, 30 Nov 2000 10:57:30 -0000
Subject: 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books
Comment:        RE: SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

A hit, a very palpable hit...

John Briggs

Terence Hawkes wrote:

Hamlet is reading Brian Vickers. He has already felt a twinge of
hendiadys and fears that aposiopesis cannot be long delayed.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephanie Hughes <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Nov 2000 17:50:12 +0000
Subject: 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 11.2185 Re: Hamlet's Books

I read somewhere the suggestion that it was Jerome Cardan's "Comfort"
that Hamlet was reading.

Stephanie Hughes
 

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